EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,214,146
Abstracts:
29,074,682
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on Google+Follow on Google+
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Mineralogy, chemical composition, and interaction of lunar simulants with humic acids






Communications in Soil Science & Plant Analysis 24(17-18): 2479-2492

Mineralogy, chemical composition, and interaction of lunar simulants with humic acids

An investigation was conducted on the mineralogy, chemical composition, and interaction of two NASA lunar simulants, Minnesota basalt and Corning glass, with humic acid (HA). Chemical composition was determined by a fluoro-boric acid digestion process. Mineral composition was investigated by x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive analysis by x-rays (EDAX). Interaction was studied by shaking samples of the lunar simulants with HA solutions at pH 2.45 and 7.0 for 1 to 40 days. Silica, Fe, and Al released were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Changes in mineral structure and elemental composition of single crystals were examined by SEM and EDAX. Minnesota basalt was composed of approximately 60% plagioclase and 40% ferromagnesian minerals. The presence of ilmenite was detected by SEM and EDAX. Corning glass was amorphous to XRD. The rate and kinetics of dissolution of the two lunar simulants were similar to those reported for soil silicates and carbonate minerals. The release of Si, Al, and Fe was curvilinear in regression, and the rate of dissolution was greater at low than at high pH. Interaction with HA resulted in crust formation covering the lunar mineral surfaces, which acted as a barrier, slowing down further dissolution with time. The concentrations of the dissolved metals were too small to create toxicity in plants, especially in the presence of HA with its high complexation capacity. If these lunar simulants are considered representative of the real lunar regolith, it is expected that the interaction between lunar minerals and soil organic matter will be similar as that between soil minerals and organic matter.

(PDF 0-2 workdays service: $29.90)

Accession: 002433950



Related references

Chemical and biological studies on environmental humic acids i. composition of elemental and functional groups of humic acids. Soil Science and Plant Nutrition 34(4): 571-584, 1988

Chemical studies on soil humic acids part 2 composition of oxygen containing functional groups of humic acids. Soil Science and Plant Nutrition 24(4): 547-560, 1978

Chemical studies on soil humic acids. II. Composition of oxygen-containing functional groups of humic acids. Soil Science and Plant Nutrition 24(4): 547-560, 1978

Chemical studies on soil humic acids part 1 elementary composition of humic acids. Soil Science and Plant Nutrition 24(3): 337-348, 1978

Physico-chemical studies on the formation of humic acids. 6. Elementary composition of humic acids.. J. Sci. Soil Tokyo, 26: 179-182, 1955

Chemical studies on soil humic acids. 1. Elementary composition of humic acids. Soil Science and Plant Nutrition 24(3): 337-347, 1978

Chemical studies on soil humic acids part 4 amino acid phenol and sugar composition in the acid hydrolysable fraction of humic acids. Soil Science & Plant Nutrition 25(1): 29-38, 1979

Chemical studies on soil humic acids IV. Amino acid, phenol, and sugar composition in the acid hydrolysable fraction of humic acids. Soil Science and Plant Nutrition 25(1): 29-38, 1979

Humic substances in the surface bottom sediments of the eastern part of the East China Sea; on the elementary composition, optical property and chemical structure of humic acids. Chishitsugaku Zasshi = Journal of the Geological Society of Japan: , Pages 23-32. 1973., 1973

Characterization of humus of humic allophane soils in Japan. 1. Humic acids (Ch)/fulvic acids (Cf) ratios. 2. Some physico-chemical properties of humic and fulvic acids. Bull. Kyushu agric. Exp. Sta, 10: 185-204, 1964