+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Plasticized whey protein edible films: water vapor permeability properties



Plasticized whey protein edible films: water vapor permeability properties



Journal of Food Science 59(2): 416-419, 423



Heat treatment, protein concentration, and pH effects on water vapor permeability (WVP) of plasticized whey protein films were examined. The best film formation conditions were neutral pH, aqueous 10% (w/w) protein solutions heated for 30 min at 90 degrees C. Isoelectric point adjustment of whey protein with calcium ascorbate buffer inceased WVP with increasing buffer concentration. The importance of vaacuum application to minimize film pore size was identified using scanning electron microscopy. Polyethylene glycol, glycerol and sorbitol plasticizer concentration affected film WVP for plasticized whey protein films enabled prediction of film behavior under any water vapor partial pressure gradient.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 002459988

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2621.1994.tb06980.x


Related references

Whey protein-okra polysaccharide fraction blend edible films: tensile properties, water vapor permeability and oxygen permeability. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 91(2): 362-369, 2011

Water vapor permeability properties of edible whey protein-lipid emulsion films. Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society 71(3): 307-312, 1994

Mechanical properties and water vapor permeability of edible films from whey protein isolate and N-ethylmaleimide or cysteine. Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry 44(12): 3789-3792, 1996

Mechanical Properties and Water Vapor Permeability of Edible Films from Whey Protein Isolate and N -Ethylmaleimide or Cysteine. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 44(12): 3789-3792, 1996

Mechanical properties and water vapor permeability of edible films from whey protein isolate and sodium dodecyl sulfate. Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry 44(2): 438-443, 1996

Optimization of edible whey protein films containing preservatives for water vapor permeability, water solubility and sensory characteristics. Journal of Food Engineering 86(2): 215-224, 2008

Dispersed phase particle size effects on water vapor permeability of whey protein-beeswax edible emulsion films. Journal of food processing and preservation 18(3): 173-188, 1994

Sorbitol- vs glycerol-plasticized whey protein edible films: integrated oxygen permeability and tensile property evaluation. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 42(4): 841-845, 1994

Water vapour permeability, thermal and wetting properties of whey protein isolate based edible films. International Dairy Journal: 1, 53-60, 2010

Water vapor permeability and mechanical properties of soy protein isolate edible films composed of different plasticizer combinations. Journal of Food Science 70(6): E387-E391, 2005

Plasticizing effects of beeswax and carnauba wax on tensile and water vapor permeability properties of whey protein films. Journal of Food Science 70(3): E239-E243, 2005

Optimization of glycerol effect on the mechanical properties and water vapor permeability of whey protein methylcellulose films. Journal of food process engineering 30(4): 485-500, 2007

Mechanical properties, water vapor permeability and water affinity of feather keratin films plasticized with sorbitol. Journal of Polymers and the Environment 14(3): 215-222, 2006

Mechanical properties, water vapor permeability, and moisture contents of b-lactoglobulin and whey protein films using multivariate analysis. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 46(5): 20-9, 1998

Mechanical Properties, Water Vapor Permeability, and Moisture Contents of β-Lactoglobulin and Whey Protein Films Using Multivariate Analysis. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 46(5): 1820-1829, 1998