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Relationship between dietary sodium intake, hemodynamics, and cardiac mass in SHR and WKY rats


American Journal of Physiology 264(1 Pt 2): R30-R34
Relationship between dietary sodium intake, hemodynamics, and cardiac mass in SHR and WKY rats
To study the effects of sodium intake on circulatory homeostasis and cardiac structure, changes in cardiac mass, systemic hemodynamics, and organ blood flows were determined in spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats after 10 wk of controlled dietary intake of low sodium (0.01%), standard sodium (0.44%), and high sodium (2 levels: 1.44 and 4%). Systemic and regional hemodynamics were measured in conscious rats using the radioactive microsphere reference method. The various dietary sodium manipulations did not cause any changes in systemic and regional hemodynamics in the WKY rats. IN contrast, the high-sodium diets increased arterial pressure and total peripheral resistance progressively in the SHR rats while decreasing cardiac index, heart rate, and organ blood flows to heart, kidneys, and splanchnic area. The higher sodium intake (4%) increased total and left ventricular mass index in both the SHR and the WKY rats even though hemodynamics of the WKY rats remained unchanged. These data indicate that the high-sodium diet, in addition to producing general vasoconstriction and exacerbation of hypertension, increased cardiac mass further in SHR rats; it also increased cardiac mass in the WKY rats independent of arterial pressure changes, suggesting that high sodium intake may be an independent pathogenetic factor for the development of cardiac hypertrophy.


Accession: 002477753

PMID: 8430884

DOI: 10.1002/ajpa.1330900213



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