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Moria in own-rooted pear plants


, : Moria in own-rooted pear plants. Rivista di Frutticoltura e di Ortofloricoltura 56(7/8): 59-62

The presence of mycoplasma-like organisms was established in trees of some varieties showing symptoms of early leaf reddening. Among the varieties examined, Doyenne du Comice had severe leaf symptoms, while Conference was without symptoms.

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Related references

Shalla, T.A.; E.A., 1961: The probable coidentity of the moria disease of pear trees in Italy and pear decline in North America. Pear decline is currently the most destructive disease of pear trees in western North America. It is estimated that over 100,000 trees were killed by this disease in California alone during the 1960 growing season. Trees die by a gradual loss of v...

Kaloostian, G.H., 1968: A leaf drop symptom associated with own-rooted Magness pear trees inoculated with pear decline virus by the pear psylla. Own-rooted Magness pear trees developed leaf drop when they were fed on by viruliferous pear psylla, Psylla pyricola, that had been transferred from trees infected with pear decline virus. Similar trees fed on by non-viruliferous psylla from an or...

Kaloostian, G.H., 1968: A leaf drop symptom associated with own-rooted Magness pear trees inoculated with pear decline virus by the pear psylla, Psylla pyricola. Own-rooted 'Magness' pear trees developed leaf drop when they were fed on by viruliferous pear psylla. Psylla pyricola Foerster, that were transferred from trees infected with pear decline virus. Similar trees fed on by nonviruliferous p...

Refatti, E., 1964: Pear 'moria' in Italy. The disease and its history in Italy, together with symptoms, are described in detail . Studies suggested that it is probably of virus origin and that irregular distribution in Italy is due to variable susceptibility of the heterogeneous Pyrus com...

Refatti, E Moglia, C.; Pessina, F., 1966: First indications of a possible virus origin of Pear moria. Results are presented of transmission tests by chip-bud grafting, using spurs from infected trees. Symptoms appeared on a few trees in late summer during an unusually dry period a year after inoculation. In most cases with an apparently positive r...

Giunchedi, L.; Credi, R.; Babini, A.R.; Bertaccini, A., 1982: Mycoplasma-like organisms associated with pear moria in Italy. Electron microscopy revealed MLOs in the phloem of 2 pear cultivars with moria-like symptoms [RAM 44, 755], indicating that this disease and pear decline are probably identical [RAM 41, 397].

Baldacci, E.; Refatti, E., 1964: Moria of pear trees in northern Italy. This disease, which is probably identical with pear decline, is spreading rapidly in young pear orchards in Italy. The tentative control measures suggested are: control of pear psylla, the suspected vector of the causal toxin or virus; bridge graf...

Refatti, E.; Moglia, C.; Pessina, F., 1966: The first indications of a possible virus origin of pear moria. Transmission tests were carried out by grafting diseased scions, mainly Williams', on various rootstocks. Symptoms of moria appeared on some of the grafted plants within a year and on others within a longer period from grafting. At the graft...

Refatti, E., 1966: The first indications of virus infection as a possible cause of pear moria. In Italy the moria disease is confined almost exclusively to pears on seedling rootstocks of Pyrus communis. Grafting gave a low percentage of transmission. Observations suggest that the symptoms manifest themselves only in plants grafted on non-t...

Refatti, E., 1968: Present status of the research on pear moria in Italy