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'Sobriety's kind of like freedom': integrating ideals of leisure into the ideology of Alcoholics Anonymous






Therapeutic Recreation Journal 29(1): 18-29

'Sobriety's kind of like freedom': integrating ideals of leisure into the ideology of Alcoholics Anonymous

A substantial number of adults in the USA experience problems of alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence. In addition to primary problems with alcohol, people with alcohol problems also demonstrate secondary problems. As a result, therapeutic recreation specialists working in a variety of settings are likely to work with clients with alcohol problems. The latter have been found to have relatively negative attitudes towards leisure and demonstrate some resistance to treatment generally.


Accession: 002549565



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