EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
52,725,316
Abstracts:
28,411,598
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on Google+Follow on Google+
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Degradation of methyl bromide by methanotrophic bacteria in cell suspensions and soils


Applied and Environmental Microbiology 60(10): 3640-3646
Degradation of methyl bromide by methanotrophic bacteria in cell suspensions and soils
Cell suspensions of Methylococcus capsulatus mineralized methyl bromide (MeBr), as evidenced by its removal from the gas phase, the quantitative recovery of Br(-) in the spent medium, and the production of (14)CO2 from [(14)C]MeBr. Methyl fluoride (MeF) inhibited oxidation of methane as well as that of [(14)C]MeBr. The rate of MeBr consumption by cells varied inversely with the supply of methane, which suggested a competitive relationship between these two substrates. However, MeBr did not support growth of the methanotroph. In soils exposed to high levels (10,000 ppm) of MeBr, methane oxidation was completely inhibited. At this concentration, MeBr removal rates were equivalent in killed and live controls, which indicated a chemical rather than biological removal reaction. At lower concentrations (1,000 ppm) of MeBr, methanotrophs were active and MeBr consumption rates were 10-fold higher in live controls than in killed controls. Soils exposed to trace levels (10 ppm) of MeBr demonstrated complete consumption within 5 h of incubation, while controls inhibited with MeF or incubated without O2 had 50% lower removal rates. Aerobic soils oxidized [(14)C]MeBr to (14)CO2, and MeF inhibited oxidation by 72%. Field experiments demonstrated slightly lower MeBr removal rates in chambers containing MeF than in chambers lacking MeF. Collectively, these results show that soil methanotrophic bacteria, as well as other microbes, can degrade MeBr present in the environment.


Accession: 002590077

PMID: 7986039



Related references

Degradation of atmospheric halogenated methanes; I, Consumption of HCFCs and methyl bromide by soil methanotrophic bacteria. Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical Union 74(43, Suppl, 1993

Oxidation of hydrochlorofluorocarbons and methylbromide by methanotrophic soils and cell suspensions. Abstracts of the General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology 93(0): 380, 1993

Bromide concentrations in water after methyl bromide soil disinfection. II. Relation between leaching of methyl bromide fumigated greenhouse soils and bromide concentrations in the surrounding surface waters Nematode control. Mededelingen van de Faculteit Landbouwwetenschappen Rijksuniversiteit6(1): 351-358, 1981

Bromide concentrations in water after methyl bromide soil disinfestation. II. Relation between leaching of methyl bromide fumigated greenhouse soils and bromide concentrations in the surrounding surface waters. Mededelingen van de Faculteit Landbouwwetenschappen Rijksuniversiteit Gent 46(1): 351-358, 1981

Bromide concentrations in water after methyl bromide soil dis infestation 2 relation between leaching of methyl bromide fumigated greenhouse soils and bromide concentrations in the surrounding surface waters. Mededelingen Van De Faculteit Landbouwwetenschappen Universiteit Gent: 351-358, 1981

Accelerated degradation of methyl bromide in methane-, 2,4-D-, and phenol-treated soils. Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 59(5): 736-743, 1997

Accelerated degradation of methyl bromide in methane-,2,4-D-, and phenol-treated soils. Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 59(5): 736-743, 1997

Stimulation of microbial degradation of the fumigant methyl bromide in soil by ammonia-oxidation bacteria. Abstracts of the General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology 96(0): 457, 1996

Accelerated degradation of methyl parathion, parathion and fenitrothion by suspensions from methyl parathion- and p-nitrophenol-treated soils. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 24(10): 1035-1042, 1992

New insights into methyl bromide cooxidation by Nitrosomonas europaea obtained by experimenting with moderately low density cell suspensions. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 66(7): 2726-2731, 2000