EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
52,725,316
Abstracts:
28,411,598
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on Google+Follow on Google+
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Degradation of mixtures of chloroaromatic compounds in soil slurry by mixed cultures of specialized organisms


Applied microbiology and biotechnology 43(3): 529-533
Degradation of mixtures of chloroaromatic compounds in soil slurry by mixed cultures of specialized organisms
The degradation of a mixture of 13 chloroaromatics, 2-chloro-, 3-chloro-, 4-chloro- and 3,4-dichloroaniline, 2-chloro-, 3-chloro-, 4-chloro-, 3,4-dichloro- and 3,5-dichlorobenzoate, and chloro-, 1,2-dichloro-, 1,4-dichloro- and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene in soil slurries by a mixed culture of Pseudomonas acidovorans strain BN 3.1, Pseudomonas ruhlandii strain FRB2, Pseudomonas cepacia strain JH230 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RHO1 was studied. About 70% of the organic bound chlorine was eliminated after 25 days from soil with a carbon content of 8% (soil 1) when 2-3 X 10(5) cells/g soil of each of the strains were added to the slurries. The effect of the clean-up was demonstrated by a biological test using cress and wheat. Both plants showed good germination and growth on both non-contaminated soils and the contaminated soil 1 after the biotreatment with the strains. No growth was observed when the plants were incubated with the contaminated soil 1 and with the contaminated and biotreated soil 2 (carbon content 2.6%). This indicates that the remaining 30% of organic chlorine in soil 1 after biotreatment does not influence the germination and growth of the two plants tested.

Accession: 002590079

DOI: 10.1007/BF00218461

Download PDF Full Text: Degradation of mixtures of chloroaromatic compounds in soil slurry by mixed cultures of specialized organisms



Related references

Degradation of chloroanilines in soil slurry by specialized organisms. Applied microbiology and biotechnology 40(2-3): 402-407, 1993

Genetic organization of the catabolic plasmid pJP4 from Ralstonia eutropha JMP134 (pJP4) reveals mechanisms of adaptation to chloroaromatic pollutants and evolution of specialized chloroaromatic degradation pathways. Environmental Microbiology 6(7): 655-668, 2004

Degradation of chlorobenzenes in soil slurry by a specialized organism. Applied microbiology and biotechnology 42(2-3): 415-420, 1994

Degradation of chlorobenzoates in soil slurry by special organisms. Applied microbiology and biotechnology 39(1): 117-122, 1993

The microbial degradation of chloroaromatic compounds. Annali di Microbiologia ed Enzimologia 37(2): 225-241, 1987

Degradation of phenolic and chloroaromatic compounds by Coprinus spp. Chemosphere 38(12): 2775-2789, May, 1999

Degradation of phenolic and chloroaromatic compounds by Coprinus spp. Chemosphere 38(12): 2775-2789, 1999

Evolution of novel metabolic pathways for the degradation of chloroaromatic compounds. Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek. 71(1-2): 159-178, 1997

Anaerobic Degradation of Chloroaromatic Compounds in Aquatic Sediments under a Variety of Enrichment Conditions. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 55(6): 1466-1471, 1989

Mutation analysis of the different tfd genes for degradation of chloroaromatic compounds in Ralstonia eutropha JMP134. Archives of Microbiology 181(2): 112-121, 2003