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Growth of bedding plants and poinsettias in mineral wool and mineral wool/peat substrates



Growth of bedding plants and poinsettias in mineral wool and mineral wool/peat substrates



Communications in Soil Science & Plant Analysis 26(3-4): 485-501



Studies were conducted to ascertain the suitability of mineral wool (MW), either alone or in combination with sphagnum peat moss, as a substrate for potted greenhouse plants. Two types of hydrophilic mineral wools, cleaned mineral wool (CMW) and uncleaned mineral wool (UMW), were used. Unamended CMW had a low bulk density, excellent water holding capacity, good aeration, but a high pH. Once peat moss was added to the CMW, bulk density remained low, water holding capacity remained good, and the pH dropped to a more suitable level. Unamended UMW had a high bulk density, good water holding capacity, poor aeration, and a high pH. Once peat moss was added to UMW, bulk density decreased, water holding capacity remained good, aeration increased, and the pH decreased to a more optimal level. CMW and UMW, were used unamended, as well as amended with 25%, 50%, and 75% peat moss. Two bedding plants, Impatiens walleriana 'Dazzler Violet' and Begonia semprflorens 'Whiskey' were grown for six and nine weeks respectively, and Euphorbia pulcherrima 'Glory' was grown for 20 weeks, in nine different substrates. Plants grown in unamended CMW and UMW were generally smaller in size and lower in MW with either 25% or 75% peat moss were similar in size and weight to plants grown in 50% MW/50% peat moss. Plant tissue analysis showed that generally plants were receiving adequate nutrition.

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Accession: 002629094

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DOI: 10.1080/00103629509369313



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