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Bees and native insects associated with leatherwoods (Eucryphia spp.) in Tasmania


, : Bees and native insects associated with leatherwoods (Eucryphia spp.) in Tasmania. Victorian Naturalist 110(6): 251-254

A study was made of insect visitors to the flowers of Eucryphia lucida, which provides the main nectar flow in Tasmania, and other Eucryphia species. A total of 133 species of arthropods were collected and identified. Numbers of insects on flowers were counted using binoculars; significantly more honey bees (from feral colonies) and native insects visited Eucryphia in lowland sites than in highland sites.

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