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Conflict-prone formation of markets for plant genetic resources: institutional and economic implications for developing countries



Conflict-prone formation of markets for plant genetic resources: institutional and economic implications for developing countries



Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture 36(1): 6-38



In the past, genetic resources have been regarded as a part of "human heritage" to which everyone had access, be it in one's own or in the public interest. Today, however, this situation is changing in a fundamental way: the demand for genetic resources is increasing as a consequence of developments in biotechnology and plant breeding, while at the same time, due to the decline in diversity of species and varieties, the natural supply of genetic resources is declining.

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