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Measurement of hepatic Ra UDP-glucose in vivo in rats: relation to glycogen deposition and labeling patterns


American Journal of Physiology 272(1 Pt 1): E155-E162
Measurement of hepatic Ra UDP-glucose in vivo in rats: relation to glycogen deposition and labeling patterns
We previously described an isotopic method for quantifying the rate of appearance of hepatic UDP-glucose (Ra UDP-Glc) and the direct entry of glucose into hepatic UDP-Glc in humans. Here, the method is tested in depth in rats. The basic principles are that dilution of labeled galactose in hepatic UDP-Glc, sampled noninvasively by the xenobiotic glucuronate (GlcUA) method, reveals Ra UDP-Glc. First, labeling patterns in secreted acetaminophen-GlcUA were compared with hepatic glycogen and plasma glucose by use of mass isotopomer distribution analysis from [2-13C]glycerol. Labeling was consistent with common precursor pools of glucose 6-phosphate and triose-phosphate for all end products studied in fasted and in intravenous glucose- and fructose-infused states. Next, [1-3H]galactose was administered. After a 24-h fast, Ra UDP-Glc was 25.0 [plus or minus] 1.7 mmol kg body wt-1 min-1 and rose to 57.7 and 72.7 mmol kg-1 min-1 at intravenous glucose infusion rates of 111 and 167-194 mmol kg-1 min-1, respectively. Liver glycogen deposition correlated closely with Ra UDP-Glc (R2 = 0.76), although the turnover value was [similar] 50% higher than the net deposition rate. In conclusion, the turnover of an intrahepatic metabolite, UDP-Glc, can be measured noninvasively, and Ra UDP-Glc correlates with liver glycogen deposition in rats. Reprinted by permission of the publisher.

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Accession: 002891868

PMID: 9038865



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