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Modulated mitogenic proliferative responsiveness of lymphocytes in whole-blood cultures after a low-carotene diet and mixed-carotenoid supplementation in women


American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 65(3): 871-875
Modulated mitogenic proliferative responsiveness of lymphocytes in whole-blood cultures after a low-carotene diet and mixed-carotenoid supplementation in women
To determine the effects of dietary carotenes on the mitogenic proliferative responsiveness of blood lymphocytes in vitro, nine premenopausal women were fed a low-carotene diet for 120 d. Low-dose beta-carotene (0.5 mg/d) was given to five subjects on days 1-60, while four received a placebo. All subjects received a low-dose beta-carotene (0.5 mg/d) supplement on days 61-120, plus a carotenoid complex on days 101-120. The mean (+/-SEM) serum beta-carotene concentration for the combined beta-carotene supplemented and placebo subjects (n = 9) was not significantly reduced from that on day 1 (1.27 +/- 0.24 mumol/L) on days 60 (0.66 +/- 0.14 mumol/L) and 100 (0.91 +/- 0.38 mumol/L), but on day 120 (3.39 +/- 0.44 mumol/L) it was increased above that on days 1, 60, and 100. Maximum mitogenic proliferative responsiveness of blood lymphocytes in vitro to optimal dose phytohemagglutinin (PHA) was reduced on days 60 (P = 0.025) and 100 (P < 0.0001), but corrected itself on day 120 to a value above those on day 1 (P = 0.04), day 60 (P = 0.0001), and day 100 (P < 0.0001). Present findings show that a diet low in carotene had a suppressive effect on the maximum mitogenic proliferative responsiveness of blood lymphocytes in vitro, which was not corrected with low-dose beta-carotene supplementation but was with a carotenoid complex from vegetables rich in carotenoids.


Accession: 002897717

PMID: 9062542



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