EurekaMag.com logo
+ Translate

Oxygen regulates imbibition of muskmelon seeds


, : Oxygen regulates imbibition of muskmelon seeds. Seed Science and Technology 23(3): 843-850

Muskmelon seeds were immersed in PEG 8000 solution at different oxygen concentrations and water potentials for 10 days with or without cyanide. Under all combinations of water potential and oxygen, seeds took up water rapidly during the first day, followed by a lag phase. Radicle protrusion of whole seeds at 0 MPa and 100% oxygen took place at 28 h. By this time, the moisture content was approximately 90% (DW basis).

(PDF 0-2 workdays service)

Accession: 002914198

Submit PDF Full Text: Here


Submit PDF Full Text

No spam - Every submission is manually reviewed

Due to poor quality, we do not accept files from Researchgate

Submitted PDF Full Texts will always be free for everyone
(We only charge for PDFs that we need to acquire)

Select a PDF file:
Close
Close

Related references

Anonymous, 2007: Reactive oxygen species production during imbibition of orthodox seeds

Ladror, U.; Dyck, R.L.; Silbernagel, M.J., 1986: Effects of oxygen and temperature during imbibition on seeds of two bean lines at two moisture levels. Low temperature (10 degrees C) and oxygen stresses were imposed during the first 48 h of germination on 2 lines of Phaseolus vulgaris, namely stress-tolerant PI165426BS and stress-sensitive Goldcrop. At 22 degrees C, O2 concentrations of 0, 1% and...

Houben, J., 1968: Imbibition in seeds of pisum sativum : II. Imbibition in an atmosphere with controlled humidity. A study of imbibition in seeds in a saturated atmosphere led to the following conclusions: 1. After a first slow phase of widely varying duration the hydration of the seeds can be expressed by an equation of the exponential type [Formula: see text...

Anonymous, 1966: Imbibition of Pisum sativum seeds I Imbibition by soaking lEngl summ

Campbell T.E., 1982: Imbibition desiccation and re imbibition effects on light requirements for germinating southern pine seeds. Slash (Pinus elliottii Engelm. var. elliotii) and loblolly (P. taeda L.) pine seeds were stratified, exposed to light, then placed in total darkness and air-dried to 30, 25, 20, 15 and 10% moisture. They were then reimbibed and half were germinate...

Ladror U.; Dyck R.L.; Silbernagel M.J., 1986: Effects of oxygen and temperature during imbibition on seeds of two bean phaseolus vulgaris lines at two moisture levels. Low temperature and oxygen stresses were imposed during the first 48 hr of germination on 2 lines of snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), stress tolerant (PI-165426-BS) and stress-sensitive ('Goldcrop'). At 22.degree. C, O2 concentrations...

Pollock B.M.; Roos E.E.; Manalo J.R., 1969: Vigor of garden bean d seeds and seedlings influenced by initial seed moisture substrate oxygen and imbibition temperature. Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science 94(6): 577-584

Pollock, B.M.; Roos, E.E.; Manalo, J.R., 1969: Vigor of garden bean seeds and seedlings influenced by initial seed moisture, substrate oxygen, and imbibition temperature. Germination of Phaseolus vulgaris was tested against stresses applied during a 24-hour imbibition period. The variables studied were temperature (15 degrees v. 25 degrees C.), substrate moisture.oxygen supply (fine sand with high moisture and low...

Pekrun, C.; Lutman, P.J.W.; Baeumer, K., 1997: Induction of secondary dormancy in rape seeds (Brassica napus L.) by prolonged imbibition under conditions of water stress or oxygen deficiency in darkness. Prolonged imbibition under conditions of water stress or oxygen deficiency can lead to the induction of secondary dormancy in rape seeds. During imbibition in darkness seeds develop light sensitivity. The percentage of seeds not germinating in the...

Mohnot, K.C.atterji, U., 1978: Thermo-physiological investigation on the imbibition and germination of seeds of certain arid zone plants. II. The seeds of Prosopis cineraria. Transactions of Indian Society of Desert Technology and University Centre of Desert Studies 3(1): 35-39