EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
52,725,316
Abstracts:
28,411,598
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on Google+Follow on Google+
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Pantoea agglomerans is the etiological agent for black spot necrosis on beach peas


Canadian Journal of Microbiology 42(12): 1252-1257
Pantoea agglomerans is the etiological agent for black spot necrosis on beach peas
Pantoea agglomerans was isolated from necrotic spots in the leaves of a beach pea (Lathyrus maritimus L.) that grew on the shorelines of Newfoundland, Canada. The bacterium produced cellulase and amylase and was shown to be a wound parasite. Ultrastructural studies of infected leaves showed bacterial aggregates surrounded by pellicles, within intercellular spaces of the necrotic tissue. The bacterium was adapted to temperate climatic conditions. On a culture medium it grew at 5-37 degree C, with optimal growth observed at 10-25 degree C. Under natural environmental conditions beach peas may be exposed to seawater. When the bacterium was tested for growth tolerance to NaCl, the NaCl was inhibitory, most noticeably at concentrations above 250 mM. Beyond contributing to mechanical injury of plant tissue and keeping the plant surface moist, it is likely that seawater would hinder, rather than enhance, the survival of the bacterium during the phase of the infection process when it was outside the host plant.

Accession: 002914867

DOI: 10.1139/m96-162

Download PDF Full Text: Pantoea agglomerans is the etiological agent for black spot necrosis on beach peas



Related references

Transfer of enterobacter agglomerans beijerinck 1888 ewing and fife 1972 to pantoea new genus as pantoea agglomerans new combination and description of pantoea dispersas. International Journal of Systematic Bacteriology 39(3): 337-345, 1989

The combination Enterobacter agglomerans is to be cited as Enterobacter agglomerans (Beijerinck 1888) Ewing and Fife 1972 and the combination Pantoea agglomerans is to be cited as Pantoea agglomerans (Beijerinck 1888) Gavini et al. 1989. Opinion 90. Judicial Commission of the International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes. International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 64(Pt 10): 3582-3583, 2014

Pantoea agglomerans: an unusual inciting agent in peritonitis. Peritoneal Dialysis International 28(4): 428-430, 2008

Bacterial spot of Chinese taro (Alocasia cucullata) in Brazil induced by Pantoea agglomerans. Plant pathology 56(6): 1038, 2007

Interaction of Pantoea agglomerans with the agent of basal bacteriosis of wheat. Mikrobiolohichnyi Zhurnal 67(1): 32-40, 2005

Pantoea agglomerans MB-9 is a potential pathogen causing necrosis on mango leaf. Plant Pathology Bulletin 15(1): 63-68, 2006

Detection and quantification by PCR assay of the biocontrol agent Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 on apples. International Journal of Food Microbiology 175: 45-52, 2014

Water activity, temperature, and pH effects on growth of the biocontrol agent Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2. Canadian Journal of Microbiology 48(12): 1082-1088, 2003

Water activity, temperature, and pH effects on growth of the biocontrol agent Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2. Canadian Journal of Microbiology 48(12): 1082-1088, 2002

The effect of nitrogen and carbon sources on growth of the biocontrol agent Pantoea agglomerans strain CPA-2. Letters in Applied Microbiology 35(2): 117-120, 2002