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Survival and growth of planted Alaska-cedar seedlings in southeast Alaska



Survival and growth of planted Alaska-cedar seedlings in southeast Alaska



Tree Planters' Notes 43(3): 60-66



Seedlings of Alaska cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis) were planted on Etolin Island in southeast Alaska and measured annually for 5 years to evaluate their survival and growth on different types of sites and microsites. Seedling survival and growth were best where light exposure and soil drainage were adequate but were poor in heavy shade or soils with impeded drainage. Burned and unburned clearcut sites supported the best survival, height growth, and diameter growth among site types.

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Accession: 002973019

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