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Survival and regeneration of dormant silver birch buds stored at super-low temperatures



Survival and regeneration of dormant silver birch buds stored at super-low temperatures



Canadian Journal of Forest Research 26(4): 617-623



Cryopreservation was developed for the storage of in vivo buds of silver birch (Betula pendula Roth). The principles of the optimized method were the use of buds already acclimated in nature and slow freezing with a cooling velocity of 10 degree C/h down to a terminal temperature of -38 degree C. After 24 h at this temperature the buds were immersed in liquid nitrogen at - 196 degree C for 8 days, 6 months, or 12 months. After fast thawing, 5 min in a water bath at 37 degree C, the buds were surface sterilized and cultured according to the normal laboratory routine. The buds were examined after 2 and 4 weeks of cultivation. There were no significant differences in survival and growth between the unfrozen controls and buds stored in liquid nitrogen for different times. The growth percentage of buds without a female catkin was double that of buds with a catkin. These results indicate that cryopreservation would be an ideal method for the ex situ gene conservation of birch and retention of the juvenility of adult genotypes.

Accession: 002973044

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DOI: 10.1139/x26-071

Download PDF Full Text: Survival and regeneration of dormant silver birch buds stored at super-low temperatures



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