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The chemical composition, the nutritive value and the functional properties of malt sprout and its components (acrospires, rootlets and husks)


J Sci Food Agric 75(1): 50-56
The chemical composition, the nutritive value and the functional properties of malt sprout and its components (acrospires, rootlets and husks)
The components of malt sprouts were effectively separated by manual winnowing into acrospires (15-3%), rootlets (40.1%) and husks (43.7%). The bitter taste was located in the acrospires. Percent recovery of protein and fibre was, respectively, 95.2 and 87.2 of malt sprouts. The acrospires were rich in protein (30.3%) and sugars (45.7%) but low in calcium (1.94 g kg-1), fibre content (4.6%) and essential amino acids. They had moderate functional properties. The rootlets were rich in calcium (19.9 g kg-1) and in protein (31.9%), which had a good nutritive value (low in phytic acid and polyphenols content). They had a moderate fibre content (10.7%). Consequently, they had the highest water absorption, oil absorption and emulsification capacities. The rootlets had relatively low foam capacity but the highest foam stability. The husks were rich in fibre content (25%) but moderate in protein content (12.4%), which was rich in essential amino acids. The husks were relatively low in calcium (11.83 g kg-1) and phosphorus (6.53 g kg-1) contents and in vitro protein digestibility (68.9%). Their functional properties were influenced by high fibre and moderate protein contents. The first limiting amino acids were sulphur-containing ones in the malt sprouts, the acrospires and the rootlets, but it was leucine in the husks.

Accession: 002980239

DOI: 10.1002/(sici)1097-0010(199709)75:1<50::aid-jsfa833>3.0.co;2-0

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