EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
52,725,316
Abstracts:
28,411,598
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on Google+Follow on Google+
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

The complex genetic basis of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxin in insects


Biocontrol science and technology(4): 405-417
The complex genetic basis of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxin in insects
Recent studies have shown that the genetic basis of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin in insects is far from simple. In this respect, it is similar to resistance to chemical insecticides, which is conferred by multiple physiological mechanisms under independent genetic control. Several lines of evidence for a complex genetic basis for resistance in tobacco budworm Heliothis virescens and diamondback moth Plutella xylostella are reviewed. This suggests that a genetic approach based on linkage mapping, capable of simultaneously analyzing multiple physiological mechanisms, will be very useful in dissecting the complex trait of resistance. In Heliothis, the existence of separate, independently assorting resistance genes has already been confirmed by linkage analysis with marker loci. This approach assists in the measurement of the relative potency of different resistance genes present in the same strain. Additionally, it facilitates comparative studies of the independent acquisition of homologous resistance mechanisms by different species. Perhaps most important from a resistance management standpoint, it directly addresses the question of whether cross-resistance is due to separate loci or the same locus. Differing properties of the diverse physiological mechanisms capable of conferring resistance yield different outcomes when contrasting scenarios of transgene toxin deployment are considered. These genetic issues have important ecological implications because they affect the rate of resistance evolution in the pests, an understanding of which is essential to the development of sensible deployment strategies of transgenic crop plants to maximize their efficacy over the long term.


Accession: 002980587

DOI: 10.1080/09583159409355351



Related references

Genetic basis of diamondback moth resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry1C. Resistant Pest Management 9(2): 21-22, 1997

Functional characterization of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxin receptors explains resistance in insects. Febs Journal (): -, 2016

Resistance of cotton lines containing a Bacillus thuringiensis toxin to pink bollworm (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) and other insects. Journal of Economic Entomology 85(4): 1516-1521, 1992

Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab in Trichoplusia ni Is Conferred by a Novel Genetic Mechanism. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 81(15): 5184-5195, 2016

Genetic Basis of Cry1F-Resistance in a Laboratory Selected Asian Corn Borer Strain and Its Cross-Resistance to Other Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins. Plos One 11(8): E0161189-E0161189, 2016

Engineering genetic resistance against insects in Japanese persimmon using the cryIA(c) gene of Bacillus thuringiensis. Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science 122(6): 764-771, 1997

Global variation in the genetic and biochemical basis of diamondback moth resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 94(24): 12780-5, 1997

Global variation in the genetic and biochemical basis of diamondback moth resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 94(24): 12780-12785, 1997

Genetic and biochemical characterization of field-evolved resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry1Ac in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 70(12): 7010-7017, 2004

Genetic basis of tobacco budworm resistance to an engineered Pseudomonas fluorescens expressing the -endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology, 572: 206-210, 1991