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A study of the conservation of tall trees at the residential area






Technical Bulletin of Faculty of Horticulture, Chiba University ( 52): 197-239

A study of the conservation of tall trees at the residential area

A survey of the distribution of mature trees was made in a modern residential area in Japan. Over 2000 trees were recorded, the majority were black pine (Pinus thunbergii), occurring on private land. Although the overall amount of green cover was low (below 30% of land), many residents were satisfied with this level: results from a questionnaire survey indicated that about 17 tall, mature trees per hectare are a satisfactory number.


Accession: 003027449



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