EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,869,633
Abstracts:
29,686,251
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Attachment-site patterns of adult blacklegged ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) on white-tailed deer and horses



Attachment-site patterns of adult blacklegged ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) on white-tailed deer and horses



Journal of Medical Entomology 35(1): 59-63



The attachment site pattern of adult Ixodes scapularis Say on white-tailed deer and horses in Maryland was determined by whole-body examinations during fall and spring periods of tick host-seeking activity. On deer in the fall, both female and male I. scapularis attached largely to anterior dorsal body regions, with at tachment to the ears (outside), head, neck, and brisket accounting for 87.9% of females and 86.6% of males. The attachment pattern of females differed between b ucks and does during fall, but not in spring, and both females and males were mo re abundant on bucks than does during fall, but not in spring. Neither female no r male attachment patterns on deer differed between fall and spring seasons. In contrast to deer, the ears and neck of horses were largely devoid of blacklegged ticks, and 84% of the females were attached either on the chest, in the axillae of the fore and rear legs, or under the jawbone. The restricted attachment of f emale blacklegged ticks to ventral body regions of horses may reflect avoidance of light. An understanding of the attachment patterns of adult I. scapularis, an increasingly abundant and economically important species, enhances sampling of feeding ticks, deticking to limit host irritation or exposure to tick-borne path ogens, and identifies body areas that should be targeted for delivery of repelle nts or acaricides.

(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 003048792

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 9542346

DOI: 10.1093/jmedent/35.1.59



Related references

Some factors affecting infestation of white-tailed deer by blacklegged ticks and winter ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) in southeastern Missouri. Journal of Medical Entomology 34(3): 372-375, 1997

Abundance, attachment sites, and density estimators of lone star ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) infesting white-tailed deer. Journal of Medical Entomology 25(4): 295-300, 1988

Seasonality in diurnal locomotory patterns of adult blacklegged ticks (Acari: Ixodidae). Journal of Medical Entomology 42(4): 582-588, 2005

Seasonality in diurnal laboratory patterns of adult blacklegged ticks (Acari: Ixodidae). Journal of medical entomology 42(4): 582-588, 2005

High Prevalence of Borrelia miyamotoi among Adult Blacklegged Ticks from White-Tailed Deer. Emerging Infectious Diseases 22(2): 316-318, 2016

Suitability of white-tailed deer as hosts for cattle fever ticks (Acari: Ixodidae). Journal of Medical Entomology 26(3): 155-158, 1989

Interdigital gland substances of white-tailed deer and the response of host-seeking ticks (Acari: Ixodidae). Journal of Medical Entomology 38(1): 114-117, 2001

Control of lone star ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) on Spanish goats and white-tailed deer with orally administered ivermectin. Journal of Economic Entomology 82(6): 1650-1656, 1989

The '4-poster' passive topical treatment device to apply acaricide for controlling ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) feeding on white-tailed deer. Journal of Medical Entomology 37(4): 588-594, 2000

Systemic treatment of white-tailed deer with ivermectin-medicated bait to control free-living populations of lone star ticks (Acari: Ixodidae). Journal of medical entomology 33(3): 385-394, 1996