EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,869,633
Abstracts:
29,686,251
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Effects of exercise on appetite control: loose coupling between energy expenditure and energy intake



Effects of exercise on appetite control: loose coupling between energy expenditure and energy intake



International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders 22 Suppl 2: S22-S29



The relationship between physical activity and energy intake (food consumption) can take a number of forms, depending on the intensity, duration and frequency of the activity, and upon the degrees of fitness and physiological status of the individual. At extremes of energy expenditure such as those found in long distance cyclists, voluntary energy intake may be sufficient to balance the enormous daily expenditure; this is due to an entraining effect. Under more normal situations, there is a widely held belief that physical activity is a poor strategy for losing weight, since the energy expended drives up hunger and food intake to compensate for the energy deficit incurred. Recent studies in both normal weight and obese individuals show that substantial periods of exercise do not increase hunger and do not drive up food intake. Comparisons between sedentary and normally active individuals, or between enforced periods of rest or strenuous activity, generate little or no effect on levels of hunger or daily energy intake, indicating a rather loose physiological coupling between energy expenditure and food intake. This view generates an optimistic view of the role of exercise in weight loss and weight control, as it indicates that intake is not automatically driven up to compensate for energy expended. Reasons why physical activity often produces disappointing effects, rise from inappropriate food choices, a desire for self-reward after exercise and misjudgements about the relative rates at which energy can be expended (by exercise) or taken in (by eating). This means that physical activity will be most beneficial for weight control, if carried out in conjunction with a low energy dense diet or with judicious control of eating.

(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 003118040

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 9778093



Related references

The influence of physical activity on appetite control: an experimental system to understand the relationship between exercise-induced energy expenditure and energy intake. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 70(2): 171-180, 2011

Energy intake over 2 days is unaffected by acute sprint interval exercise despite increased appetite and energy expenditure. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism 40(1): 79-86, 2016

Meals with similar energy densities but rich in protein, fat, carbohydrate, or alcohol have different effects on energy expenditure and substrate metabolism but not on appetite and energy intake. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 77(1): 91-100, 2002

Meals with similar energy densities but rich in protein, fat, carbohydrate, or alcohol have different effects on energy expenditure and substrate metabolism but not on appetite and energy intake. American journal of clinical nutrition 77(1): 91-100, 2003

Uncoupling the effects of energy expenditure and energy intake: appetite response to short-term energy deficit induced by meal omission and physical activity. Appetite 31(1): 9-19, 1998

Acute effects of mustard, horseradish, black pepper and ginger on energy expenditure, appetite, ad libitum energy intake and energy balance in human subjects. British Journal of Nutrition 109(3): 556-563, 2014

Effects of PYY3-36 and GLP-1 on energy intake, energy expenditure, and appetite in overweight men. American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism 306(11): E1248-E1256, 2014

Effects of PYY1-36 and PYY3-36 on appetite, energy intake, energy expenditure, glucose and fat metabolism in obese and lean subjects. American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism 292(4): E1062-8, 2006

Effects of combined GIP and GLP-1 infusion on energy intake, appetite and energy expenditure in overweight/obese individuals: a randomised, crossover study. Diabetologia 2019, 2019

Sucrose compared with artificial sweeteners: a clinical intervention study of effects on energy intake, appetite, and energy expenditure after 10 wk of supplementation in overweight subjects. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 100(1): 36-45, 2015

Caffeine consumption around an exercise bout: effects on energy expenditure, energy intake, and exercise enjoyment. Journal of Applied Physiology 117(7): 745-754, 2015

Effects of uphill exercise on digestible energy intake and energy expenditure during exercise in yearling horses. Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences 17(7): 973-979, 2004

Effects of uphill exercise on digestible energy intake and energy expenditure during exercise in yearling horses. Asian Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences 17(7): 973-979, 2004

Effects of Aerobic Exercise Intensity on Energy Intake, Appetite and Energy-Regulating Hormones in Sedentary Young Women. 2013

Total peptide YY is a correlate of postprandial energy expenditure but not of appetite or energy intake in healthy women. Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental 57(10): 1458-1464, 2008