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Chapter 3,121

Effects of pre- or postpartum selenium supplementation on selenium status in beef cows and their calves

Enjalbert, F.; Lebreton, P.; Salat, O.; Schelcher, F.

Journal of Animal Science 77(1): 223-229

1999


ISSN/ISBN: 0021-8812
PMID: 10064048
DOI: 10.2527/1999.771223x
Accession: 003120361

The effect of Se supplementation before or after calving on Se status in deficient cows and their calves was studied using 72 beef cows in two experiments. In Exp. 1, cows calving in February or March 1997 were supplemented orally for 15 d in late pregnancy with 13.0, 32.5, or 45.5 mg of Se/d as sodium selenite. Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were measured in red blood cells (RBC) or plasma of cows and calves at d 15 and between d 17 and 88 after calving. In Exp. 2, cows calving in January 1997 were supplemented orally with .0, 13.0, or 32.5 mg of Se/d for 15 d postpartum, and calves were injected with 1.38 mg of Se when 2 d old and at an average age of 49 d. The GSH-Px activities were measured in 30-d-old calves and in cows and calves between d 77 and 115 after calving. In both experiments, Se supplementation resulted in adequate Se status for the dams. The increase in RBC GSH-Px activity was faster with 45.5 mg of Se/d, and GSH-Px activities remained high for up to 98 d after the end of supplementation. The improvement in Se status in calves as a result of maternal supplementation was greater in Exp. 1 than in Exp. 2, suggesting that the placental transfer of Se is more efficient than milk transfer. Prepartum oral Se supplementation of deficient beef cows with 13.0 mg of Se/d for 15 d allowed adequate Se status of dams and calves, and 45.5 mg of Se/d resulted in a faster improvement of Se status. Parenteral administration of 1.38 mg of Se to newborn calves did not sustain normal Se status in calves issued from deficient cows.

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