EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
47,893,527
Abstracts:
28,296,643
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on Google+Follow on Google+
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

How natural habitat patchiness affects the distribution of diversity in Californian serpentine chaparral






Ecology (Washington D C) 78(6): 1898

How natural habitat patchiness affects the distribution of diversity in Californian serpentine chaparral

Components of diversity in the woody plant community were compared among three sets of sites in the Coast Ranges of Northern California: 24 small patches (0.5-3 ha) of serpentine soil, found in four sets of 5-7 patches; 24 equivalently spaced sampling sites within four large (6-55 km-2) continuous areas of serpentine; and 24 sites on the nonserpentine soils adjacent to the small patches. On patchy compared with continuous serpentine, alpha diversity (local) was 32% lower, gamma diversity (total) was 17% higher, and beta diversity (differentiation in species composition among sites) was 72% higher. Of the increased beta diversity on patches, most (62%) occurred at the "local" scale of patches 50-3200 m apart, and only 10% occurred at the scale of clusters of patches 16-45 km apart. Complementarity, an alternative measure of beta diversity, showed the same patterns. Woody plants on nonserpentine soils showed diversity patterns similar to those on patchy serpentine, i.e., lower alpha and higher beta and gamma diversity relative to continuous serpentine. Nonserpentine plants showed a stronger response to environmental gradients than did serpentine plants. For the woody plant community. on serpentine soils, the natural large-scale patchiness of the habitat leads to lower local diversity but higher differentiation and regional diversity. The increased regional diversity appears to be almost entirely the result of edge effects, rather than of "patchy coexistence" as described by metacommunity models.

Accession: 003162522

DOI: 10.1890/0012-9658(1997)078[1898:HNHPAT]2.0.CO;2

Download PDF Full Text: How natural habitat patchiness affects the distribution of diversity in Californian serpentine chaparral



Related references

Harrison, S., 1997: How natural habitat pathiness affects the distribution of diversity in Californian serpentine chaparral. Ecology 78(6): 1898-1906

Wolf, A.T.; Harrison, S.P.; Hamrick, J.L., 2000: Influence of habitat patchiness on genetic diversity and spatial structure of a serpentine endemic plant. The genetic diversity in 32 populations of Calystegia collina, a self-compatible cloning plant endemic to serpentine substrate in northern California's Coast Range, was investigated. Ramets from the most abundant genotypes in a population wer...

Safford, H.D.; Harrison, S.P., 2001: Fire effects on plant diversity in serpentine versus non-serpentine chaparral and grassland. Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting Abstracts 86: 196

Sulkava, P.; Huhta, V., 1998: Habitat patchiness affects decomposition and faunal diversity: A microcosm experiment on forest floor. Environmental heterogeneity has been intensively studied, but little is known about relationships between habitat patchiness and soil processes. The aim of this study was to investigate (1) the impact of patchiness of the litter layer on the decom...

Sulkava, P.; Huhta, V., 1998: Habitat patchiness affects decomposition and faunal diversity: a microcosm experiment on the forest floor. Environmental heterogeneity has been intensively studied, but little is known about relationships between habitat patchiness and soil processes. The aim of this study was to investigate (1) the impact of patchiness of the litter layer on the decom...

Harrison, S.; Davies, K.F.; Safford, H.D.; Viers, J.H., 2006: Beta diversity and the scale-dependence of the productivity-diversity relationship: a test in the Californian serpentine flora. 1. The relationship of productivity to species diversity is usually positive at regional scales, but is often neutral, unimodal or negative at local spatial scales. Recent studies have pointed out that beta diversity, or among-locality and within-...

Harrison, S.; Rice, K.; Maron, J., 2001: Habitat patchiness promotes invasion by alien grasses on serpentine soil. Serpentine soils are considerably less invaded by alien species than nonserpentine soils in California's North Coast Ranges, USA. However, alien species are significantly more prevalent on small patches of serpentine (< 5 ha) than in the i...

O.Leary, J.F., 1988: Habitat differentiation among herbs in postburn Californian chaparral and coastal sage scrub. In studies of S. Californian chaparral and coastal sage scrub in the spring after a fire in Oct. 1978 sites were classified by aspect (N. and S.), substrate (andesite and sandstone), and alt. (150-m intervals). Soil analyses revealed several signi...

O'leary J.F., 1988: Habitat differentiation among herbs in postburn californian usa chaparral and coastal sage scrub. Habitat differentiation of herbs ("pyrophyte endimics") appearing during the first postburn spring in southern California chaparral and coastal sage scrub was examined. Study sites were classified by aspect (N and S), substrate (andesite...

Safford, H.D.; Harrison, S., 2004: Fire effects on plant diversity in serpentine vs. sandstone chaparral. The effects of fire on plant diversity in chaparral vegetation on more-productive sandstone and less-productive serpentine soils were examined. Changes in plant community for 3 years after a fire were measured in 40 pairs of burned and unburned 25...