Medical students' attitudes toward patients with HIV infection. A comparison study of 169 first-year students at the University of Chicago and the University of New Mexico

Carter, D.; Roberts, L.W.

Journal of the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association 1(4): 209-226

1997


ISSN/ISBN: 1090-7173
Accession: 003198743

Download citation:  
Text
  |  
BibTeX
  |  
RIS

Article/Abstract emailed within 1 workday
Payments are secure & encrypted
Powered by Stripe
Powered by PayPal

Abstract
First-year medical students at the University of Chicago and the University of New Mexico were surveyed (N = 169, 89.4% response rate) in a classroom setting, using a previously piloted instrument containing demographic information and additudinal statements. Despite demographic differences, students at the two institutions were similar with respect to willingness to treat, knowing someone personally with HIV, political beliefs, and other parameters. Students reported high willingness to treat HIV, with 92% agreeing that patients with HIV would be welcome in their medical offices, for example. The predictive model accounted for 49% of the variance in the Willingness to Treat scale with 7 variables. Professional Obligation, Fear of Nosocomial Infection, and Attitudes toward Gays and Lesbians were the most important attitudinal predictors.