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Metabolizable energy of some feeds used in frog diets






Revista Brasileira de Zootecnia 27(6): 1051-1056

Metabolizable energy of some feeds used in frog diets

The objective of this study was to determine, in a digestibility essay, the metabolizable energy of some ingredients, by means of the forced feeding technique. Three hundred and sixty frogs were selected at the initial stage and 288 in the finishing stage, with average weights of 28.32 and 135.3 g, respectively, housed in plastic boxes. Thirty adult frogs were maintained in fast to determine the endogenous and metabolic losses. For the initial stage, the values of apparent metabolizable dry matter (AMDM,%), apparent metabolizable energy (AME, kcal/kg), apparent metabolizable energy corrected by the nitrogen retention (AMEn, kcal/kg) were, respectively: corn meal 60.44; 2090 and 2045; gelatinezated corn 65.10; 2308 and 2298; soybean meal 78.29; 2704 and 2221; wheat meal 63.31; 1950 and 1821; cottonseed meal 26.45; 1484 and 1352; rice meal 61.25; 1624 and 1663; fish meal 75.03; 3035 and 2455; meat and bone meal 39.26; 2094 and 1757; chicken viscera meal 66.06; 3521 and 3090. For the finishing phase, the values of AMDM, AME, AMEn, true metabolizable energy (TME, kcal/kg), TMEn (kcal/kg) were, respectively: corn meal 68.05; 2498; 2308; 2552 and 2551; gelatinezated corn 49.25; 1613; 1607; 1666 and 1665; soybean meal 75.15; 2780; 2430; 2857 and 2856; wheat meal 71.16; 2429; 2295; 2510 and 2509; cottonseed meal 49.60; 1659; 1503; 1750 and 1749; rice meal 58.94; 1452; 1488; 1536 and 1535; fish meal 82.69; 3217; 2638; 3313 and 3311; meat and bone meat 60.28; 2309; 1912; 2371 and 2369; chicken viscera meal 75.37; 3850; 3379; 3913 and 3911.

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Accession: 003199582



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