+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Nitrogen fixation capacity and nodule occupancy by Bradyrhizobium japonicum and B. elkanii strains



Nitrogen fixation capacity and nodule occupancy by Bradyrhizobium japonicum and B. elkanii strains



Biology and Fertility of Soils 27(4): 393-399



In a previous study soybean Bradyrhizobium strains, used in Brazilian studies and inoculants over the last 30 years, and strains adapted to the Brazilian Cerrados, a region frequently submitted to environmental and nutritional stresses, were analyzed for 32 morphological and physiological parameters in vivo and in vitro. A cluster analysis allowed the subdivision of these strains into species Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Bradyrhizobium elkanii and a mixed genotype. In this study, the bacteria were analyzed for nodulation. N fixation capacity, nodule occupancy and the ability to increase yield. The goal was to find a relationship between the strain groups and the symbiotic performance. Two strains of Brazilian B. japonicum showed higher rates of N2 fixation and nodule efficiency (mg of N mg(-1) of nodules) under axenic conditions. These strains also showed greater yield increases in field experiments when compared to B. elkanii strains. However, no differences were detected between B. japonicum and B. elkanii strains when comparing nodule occupancy capacity. The adapted strains belonging to the serogroup B. elkanii SEMIA 566, most clustered in a mixed genotype, were more competitive than the parental strain, and some showed a higher capacity of N fixation. Some of the adapted strains, such as S-370 and S-372, have shown similar N2 fixation rates and nodulation competitiveness to two Brazilian strains of B. japonicum. This similarity demonstrates the possibility of enhancing N2 fixing ability, after local adaptation, even within B. elkanii species. Differences in the DNA profiles were also detected between the parental SEMIA 566 and the adapted strains by analyses with the ERIC and REP-PCR techniques. Consequently, genetic, morphological and physiological changes can be a result of adaptation of rhizobia to the soil. This variability can be used to select strains capable of increasing the contribution of N2 fixation to soybean nutrition.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 003213488

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

DOI: 10.1007/s003740050449


Related references

Effects of two collembola species on nodule occupancy by two Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 25(6): 775-780, 1993

Sampling to the determine nodule occupancy of soybean Merr by Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains. Canadian Journal of Microbiology 44(8): 795-799, 1998

Relationship between glyceollin accumulation and nitrogen fixation capacity of nodules formed by bradyrhizobium japonicum strains. Phytopathology 77(12): 1753, 1987

Sampling to determine nodule occupancy of soybean ( Glycine max (L) Merr.) by Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains. Canadian Journal of Microbiology 44(8): 795-799, 1998

Symbiotic efficiency of Hup+, Huphr and Hup- strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Bradyrhizobium elkanii in cowpea cultivars. Pesquisa Agropecuaria Brasileira 34(10): 1925-1931, 1999

Adhesion behaviour of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Bradyrhizobium elkanii strains: evidence of duality between the two species. Soil biology and biochemistry 27(12): 1657-1660, 1995

A Selective Medium for the Isolation and Quantification of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Bradyrhizobium elkanii Strains from Soils and Inoculants. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 60(2): 581-586, 1994

Competition for nodule occupancy of introduced Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains in a Wisconsin soil with a low indigenous bradyrhizobia population. Canadian Journal of Microbiology 36(12): 839-845, 1990

Competition for nodule occupancy of introduced bradyrhizobium japonicum strains in a wisconsin usa soil with a low indigenous bradyrhizobia population. Canadian Journal of Microbiology 36(12): 839-845, 1990

Competition for nodule occupancy of introduced Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain SMGS1 in French soils already containing Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain G49. Canadian Journal of Microbiology 39(11): 1022-1028, 1993

Nitrogen fixation nitrogen 15 dilution with soybeans under thai field conditions iv. effect of nitrogen addition and bradyrhizobium japonicum inoculation in soils with indigenous bradyrhizobium japonicum populations. Journal of Applied Bacteriology 67(2): 137-144, 1989

Bradyrhizobium japonicum mutants defective in root nodule bacteroid development and nitrogen fixation. Archives of Microbiology 144(4): 355-366, 1986

Establishment of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and B. elkanii strains in a Brazilian Cerrado oxisol. Biology & Fertility of Soils 40(1): 28-35, 2004

Presence of natural variants of Bradyrhizobium elkanii and Bradyrhizobium japonicum and detection of Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense in Phitsanulok province, Thailand. Scienceasia 38(1): 24-29, 2012

An evaluation of the N-fixation capacity of some Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains for soybean cultivars. Iranian Journal of Agricultural Sciences 34(1): 97-104, 2003