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Potyvirus genome-linked protein (VPg) determines pea seed-borne mosaic virus pathotype-specific virulence in Pisum sativum


, : Potyvirus genome-linked protein (VPg) determines pea seed-borne mosaic virus pathotype-specific virulence in Pisum sativum. Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions 11(2): 124-130

The mechanism of Pisum sativum pathotype-specific resistance to pea seed-borne mosaic potyvirus (PSbMV) was investigated and the coding region determinant of PSbMV virulence was defined. Homozygous recessive sbm-1 peas are unable to support replication of PSbMV pathotype 1 (P-1), whereas biochemically and serologically related pathotype 4 (P-4) is fully infectious in the sbm-1/sbm-1 genotype. We were unable to detect viral coat protein or RNA with double antibody sandwich-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in sbm-1/sbm-1 P-1-inoculated protoplasts and plants. Lack of viral coat protein or RNA in P-1 transfected sbm-1/sbm-1 protoplasts suggests that sbm-1 resistance is occurring at the cellular level and that inhibition of cell-to-cell virus movement is not the operating form of resistance. In addition, because virus products were not detected at any time post-inoculation, resistance must either be constitutive or expressed very early in the virus infection process. P-1-resistant peas challenged with full-length, infectious P-1/P-4 recombinant clones demonstrated that a specific P-4 coding region, the 21-kDa, genome-linked protein (VPg), was capable of overcoming sbm-1 resistance, whereas clones containing the P-1 VPg coding region were noninfectious to sbm-1/sbm-1 peas. VPg is believed to be involved in potyvirus replication and its identification as the PSbMV determinant of infectivity in sbm-1/sbm-1 peas is consistent with disruption of an early P-1 replication event.


Accession: 003237406

PMID: 9450335

DOI: 10.1094/MPMI.1998.11.2.124

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Related references

Borgstrøm, B.; Johansen, I.E., 2001: Mutations in pea seedborne mosaic virus genome-linked protein VPg after pathotype-specific virulence in Pisum sativum. Pisum sativum plant introduction (PI) line 269818 is resistant to potyvirus pea seedborne mosaic virus (PSbMV) isolates, categorized as pathotype P1, and is susceptible to pathotype P4 isolates. This difference in infectivity is determined by the...

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