EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
47,893,527
Abstracts:
28,296,643
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on Google+Follow on Google+
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Tall planting stock of deciduous trees


, : Tall planting stock of deciduous trees. AFZ/Der Wald, Allgemeine Forst Zeitschrift fur Waldwirtschaft und Umweltvorsorge 54(5): 218-220

The advantages and disadvantages of tall planting stock (height of 140-180 cm) are described.


Accession: 003292582

Submit PDF Full Text: Here


Submit PDF Full Text

No spam - Every submission is manually reviewed

Due to poor quality, we do not accept files from Researchgate

Submitted PDF Full Texts will always be free for everyone
(We only charge for PDFs that we need to acquire)

Select a PDF file:
Close
Close

Related references

Blauermel, G., 1983: If trees are to thrive in city streets--planning and preparation of the planting site, protection, species selection, quality of stock, and planting and maintenance of street trees. Garten Landschaft = Landscape architecture planning 93(3): 185-195

Briggs, Alba H., 1939: Report of planting experiment to determine the effect of root exposure on deciduous planting stock. The effect of exposing the roots before planting was studied on about 3000 trees of each of 10 spp., in Oklahoma. One lot of each sp. was exposed for up to 3 hrs. and then planted, in the fall of 1937, another lot in early spring and another in la...

Neruda, J., 1999: Technology for the production and planting of large-sized planting stock of forest trees. The paper summarizes the results of the Czech research project 'Technology of planting and production of large-sized planting stock' (1995-97), which examined new techniques for raising and planting large stock (large seedlings - 51-120...

Evequoz, N.; Monney, P., 2002: Fruit tree nursery: study of bench grafting, planting stock production and planting of pear trees. In a study at Changins, Switzerland, bench-grafting was performed using Conference as the scion and quince EMA as the rootstock. The grafted plants were grown in 5-litre containers under glass. Three grafting times were compared, 15 February, 1 Ma...

Petheram, H.D.; Porter Field, H., 1941: Cold storage of deciduous planting stock. A storage vault at temps. between 28[degree] and 34[degree] F, used to keep planting stock dormant until the arrival of favorable planting conditions, gave satisfactory results.

Pampe, A., 2001: Experiments with tall planting stock of sessile oak and beech in Northwest Germany. Six types of tall planting stock of sessile oak [Quercus petraea] and beech [Fagus sylvatica] were tested at 10 sites in 4 forest districts. At the end of the 3rd growing season, mortality varied from 3 to 55% with only little correlation to stock...

Newton, M.C.le, E.; White, D., 1993: Tall planting stock for enhanced growth and domination of brush in the Douglas-fir region. Two long-term experiments followed development of planted stock of various sizes, origins, and species. In one experiment, multiyear comparisons of container, 2-0 bareroot, and 3-year-old Douglas-fir transplants showed strong positive relationship...

Cantrill, Rj, 1972: Planting deciduous trees

Elias P., 1979: Stomatal activity within the crowns of tall deciduous trees under forest conditions. The variation in stomatal activity within the crowns of Acer campestre, Carpinus betulus and Quercus cerris was measured by vapor exchange porometer on several summer days in an oak-hornbeam forest, in southwest Slovakia, Czechoslovakia. Variation...

Maruyama, K.; Toyama, Y., 1987: Effect of water stress on photosynthesis and transpiration in three tall deciduous trees. Six-yr-old, pot grown seedlings of Fagus crenata, Quercus mongolica var. grosseserrata [Q. crispula] and Q. serrata were watered and then allowed to dry out in a greenhouse for up to 7 days in Aug. or Sep. 1984. In all species, the xylem pressure...