+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Virulence markers in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolated from cattle



Virulence markers in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolated from cattle



Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research 63(3): 177-184



Potential virulence markers were identified in 93 eae-positive and 179 eae-negative Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), isolated from a random sampling of healthy cattle in southwestern Ontario, Canada PCR amplification was used to identify genes for enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC)-haemolysin, the EAF plasmid, and bundle-forming pili (Bfp); adherence to HEp-2 cells and to bovine colonocytes, and the fluorescent actin staining (FAS) test were used to characterize interaction of the bacteria with epithelial cells. The EHEC-haemolysin sequences were detected in 98% of eae-positive isolates compared with 34% of eae-negative isolates. All isolates were negative for EAF and bfp sequences. There was 100% correlation between localized adherence (LA) to HEp-2 cells and the FAS test. 48 (52%) of the eae-positive isolates were LA/FAS-positive, whereas none of the 179 eae-negative isolates was positive in either test. Among the eae-negative isolates, 20 (11%) showed diffuse adherence and 5 (2.8%) showed enteroaggregative adherence to HEp-2 cells. 73% of the eae-positive isolates adhered to bovine colonocytes, whereas only 26% of 120 eae-negative isolates that were tested adhered. All 13 O157:H7 isolates were positive for eae and EHEC-haemolysin gene sequences, LA/FAS and adherence to bovine colonocytes. It is concluded that possession of genes for eae and EHEC haemolysin is correlated with the serotype of STEC, that production of EHEC haemolysin was highly correlated with serotypes implicated in human disease, and that none of the potential markers that were examined can be used to predict the potential virulence of an isolate.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 003333171

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 10480459


Related references

Virulence markers and serotypes of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, isolated from cattle in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Letters in Applied Microbiology 44(4): 419-425, 2007

Virulence markers and genetic relationships of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains from serogroup O111 isolated from cattle. Veterinary Microbiology 119(2-4): 358-365, 2006

Serotypes and virulence markers of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) isolated from dairy cattle in São Paulo State, Brazil. Veterinary Microbiology 105(1): 29-36, 2004

Serotypes, virulence markers and cell invasion ability of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains isolated from healthy dairy cattle. Journal of Applied Microbiology 121(4): 1130-1143, 2017

Virulence genes, Shiga toxin subtypes, major O-serogroups, and phylogenetic background of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains isolated from cattle in Iran. Microbial Pathogenesis 109: 274-279, 2017

Virulence factors in Shiga-like toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolated from humans and cattle. Journal of Infectious Diseases 165(5): 979-980, 1992

Variation in the Distribution of Putative Virulence and Colonization Factors in Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Isolated from Different Categories of Cattle. Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology 7: 147, 2017

Virulence genes and intimin types of Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolated from cattle and beef products in Argentina. International Microbiology 7(4): 269-276, 2005

Virulence profile comparison between LEE-negative Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains isolated from cattle and humans. Veterinary Microbiology 143(2-4): 307-313, 2010

Virulence properties and antimicrobial susceptibility of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains isolated from healthy cattle from Paraná State, Brazil. Canadian Journal of Microbiology 54(7): 588-593, 2008

Characterization and Virulence Potential of Serogroup O113 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Beef and Cattle in the United States. Journal of Food Protection 80(3): 383-391, 2017

Prevalence and genetic profiling of virulence determinants of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolated from cattle, beef, and humans, Calcutta, India. Emerging Infectious Diseases 8(1): 54-62, 2001

Distribution of virulence genes related to adhesins and toxins in shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains isolated from healthy cattle and diarrheal patients in Japan. Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 72(5): 589-597, 2010

Characterization of virulence markers in Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli from Minnesota. Abstracts of the General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology 99: 237, 1999

Stx2 Subtyping of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Isolated from Cattle in France: Detection of a New Stx2 Subtype and Correlation with Additional Virulence Factors. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 40(9): 3548-3548, 2002