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Discrimination of prey, but not plant, chemicals by actively foraging, insectivorous lizards, the lacertid Takydromus sexlineatus and the teiid Cnemidophorus gularis



Discrimination of prey, but not plant, chemicals by actively foraging, insectivorous lizards, the lacertid Takydromus sexlineatus and the teiid Cnemidophorus gularis



Journal of Chemical Ecology 26(7): 1623-1634



We studied chemosensory responses to chemicals from prey and palatable plants in two species of actively foraging, insectivorous lizards. Both the lacertid Takydromus sexlineatus and the teiid Cnemidophorus gularis exhibited strong responses to prey chemicals, but not to plant chemicals.

Accession: 003408198

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DOI: 10.1023/a:1005534828701

Download PDF Full Text: Discrimination of prey, but not plant, chemicals by actively foraging, insectivorous lizards, the lacertid Takydromus sexlineatus and the teiid Cnemidophorus gularis



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