+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Responses of leaf respiration to temperature and leaf characteristics in three deciduous tree species vary with site water availability



Responses of leaf respiration to temperature and leaf characteristics in three deciduous tree species vary with site water availability



Tree Physiology 21(9): 571-578



We measured responses of leaf respiration to temperature and leaf characteristics in three deciduous tree species (Quercus rubra L., Quercus prinus L. and Acer rubrum L.) at two sites differing in water availability within a single catchment in the Black Rock Forest, New York. The response of respiration to temperature differed significantly among the species. Acer rubrum displayed the smallest increase in respiration with increasing temperature. Corresponding Q(10) values ranged from 1.5 in A. rubrum to 2.1 in Q. prinus. Dark respiration at ambient air temperatures, expressed on a leaf area basis (Rarea), did not differ significantly between species, but it was significantly lower (P < 0.01) in trees at the wetter (lower) site than at the drier (upper) site (Q. rubra: 0.8 versus 1.1 micromol m(-2) s(-1); Q. prinus: 0.95 versus 1.2 micromol m(-2) s(-1)). In contrast, when expressed on a leaf mass basis (R(mass)), respiration rates were significantly higher (P < 0.01) in A. rubrum (12.5-14.6 micromol CO(2) kg(-1) s(-1)) than in Q. rubra (8.6-9.9 micromol CO(2) kg(-1) s(-1)) and Q. prinus (9.2-10.6 micromol CO(2) kg(-1) s(-1)) at both the lower and upper sites. Respiration on a nitrogen basis (R(N)) displayed a similar response to R(mass). The consistency in R(mass) and R(N) between sites indicates a strong coupling between factors influencing respiration and those affecting leaf characteristics. Finally, the relationships between dark respiration and A(max) differed between sites. Trees at the upper site had higher rates of leaf respiration and lower A(max) than trees at the lower site. This shift in the balance of carbon gain and loss clearly limits carbon acquisition by trees at sites of low water availability, particularly in the case of A. rubrum.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 003549252

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 11390301

DOI: 10.1093/treephys/21.9.571


Related references

Acclimation of Leaf Respiration to Temperature Is Rapid and Related to Specific Leaf Area, Soluble Sugars and Leaf Nitrogen across Three Temperate Deciduous Tree Species. Functional Ecology 19(4): 640-647, 2005

Acclimation of leaf respiration to temperature is rapid and related to specific leaf area, soluble sugars and leaf nitrogen across three temperate deciduous tree species. Functional Ecology 19(4): 640-647, 2005

Does the direct effect of atmospheric CO2 concentration on leaf respiration vary with temperature? Responses in two species of Plantago that differ in relative growth rate. Physiologia Plantarum 114(1): 57-64, 2002

Responses of gas exchange and phototropic leaf orientation in soybean to soil water availability, leaf water potential, air temperature, and photosynthetic photon flux. Bulletin of mathematical biology 31(3): 153-161, 1969

Responses of gas exchange and phototropic leaf orientation in soybean to soil water availability leaf water potential air temperature and photosynthetic photon flux. Environmental & Experimental Botany 32(2): 153-161, 1992

Variations in leaf respiration and photosynthesis ratio in response to air temperature and water availability among Mediterranean evergreen species. Journal of Arid Environments 102: 82-88, 2014

Direct effect of elevated CO(2) on nocturnal in situ leaf respiration in nine temperate deciduous tree species is small. Tree Physiology 20(2): 139-144, 2000

Direct effect of elevated Co2 on nocturnal in situ leaf respiration in nine temperate deciduous tree species is small. Tree Physiology 20(2): 139-144, 2000

Responses of leaf colouring in four deciduous tree species to climate and weather in Germany. Climate Research 32(3): 253-267, 2006

Light-mediated constraints on leaf function correlate with leaf structure among deciduous and evergreen tree species. Tree Physiology 21(18): 1341-1346, 2001

Comparison of leaf life span, photosynthesis and defensive traits across seven species of deciduous broad-leaf tree seedlings. Annals of Botany 97(5): 813-817, 2006

Relationships between leaf life span, leaf mass per area, and leaf nitrogen cause different altitudinal changes in leaf delta 13C between deciduous and evergreen species. Botany: 11, 1233-1241, 2008

Acclimation of leaf water status and stem hydraulics to drought and tree neighbourhood: alternative strategies among the saplings of five temperate deciduous tree species. Tree Physiology 37(4): 456-468, 2017

Relationship between specific leaf area, leaf thickness, leaf water content andSPAD-502readings in six Amazonian tree species. Photosynthetica 47(2): 184-190, 2009

Leaf water relations and anatomy of a tropical rainforest tree species vary with crown position. Oecologia 74(1): 81-85, 1987