EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,869,633
Abstracts:
29,686,251
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

The effect of feeding pods of multipurpose trees (MPTs) on the degradability of dry matter and cell wall constituents of maize stover and alfalfa incubated in the rumen of sheep



The effect of feeding pods of multipurpose trees (MPTs) on the degradability of dry matter and cell wall constituents of maize stover and alfalfa incubated in the rumen of sheep



Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 81(13): 1235-1243



This study evaluated the effects of feeding alfalfa and pods of tree legumes on rumen pH and ammonia concentration as well as in sacco degradability of dry matter and fibre constituents of maize stover, alfalfa hay and their neutral detergent extracts. The feeds were incubated in the rumens of five South African Merino sheep fed individually in an incomplete (5 x 4) Latin square design using five diets. The diets comprised equal proportions of pasture hay and either alfalfa (Alfalfa diet) or pods of Acacia sieberiana (Sieberiana diet), Acacia nilotica (Nilotica diet) or Leucaena leucocephala (Leucaena diet). The fifth diet was composed of pasture hay alone (Hay diet) and served as a negative control. Supplementation of hay with either legume pods or alfalfa significantly (p < 0.05) increased rumen ammonia concentration from 56 to a maximum of 86 mg l(-1). The pH of the rumen fluid ranged between 6.2 and 6.5 for all diets, but variations in pH were not significant. Diet did not affect (p > 0.05) the degradability constants lag time (LT), slowly degradable fraction (B), potential degradability (PD), effective degradability (ED) and rate of degradation (C) of dry matter (DM) but significantly (p < 0.01) affected ED of the fibre constituents of the incubated feeds. The effective degradabilities of the incubated feeds differed (p < 0.001), with alfalfa and maize stover having average values of 555 and 318 g kg-1 DM respectively. The rate of degradation of alfalfa was also higher (p < 0.01) than that of maize stover. Neutral detergent extraction improved ED of the cell wall constituents of maize stover but produced the opposite effect for alfalfa. The interactions between incubation feed and extract were significant (p < 0.01) for ED and C of neutral detergent fibre and hemicellulose. The observations show that pods from tree legumes are comparable to alfalfa in the provision of rumen ammonia but limit microbial activity in the degradability of fibre constituents. They also show that maize stover and alfalfa differ in their degradabilities and that the differences may be attributed to their cell wall chemistry.

(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 003584113

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

DOI: 10.1002/jsfa.930



Related references

Rate and extent of digestion of cotton thread and of dry matter and cell wall constituents of soybean stover alfalfa and their blends and rumen characteristics of sheep fed these forages. Canadian Journal of Animal Science 63(2): 373-380, 1983

Inter-relationships between chemical constituents, rumen dry matter and nitrogen degradability in fresh leaves of multipurpose trees. Journal of the Science of Food & Agriculture 69(2): 235-246, 1995

Effect of supplementation of maize stover with foliage of various tropical multipurpose trees and Lablab purpureus on intake, rumen fermentation, digesta kinetics and microbial protein supply of sheep. Animal Feed Science and Technology 113(1-4): 83-96, 2004

Effect of supplementation of maize stover with foliage of various tropical multipurpose trees and Lablab purpureus on intake, rumen fermentation, digesta kinetics and microbial protein supply of sheep. Animal Feed Science & Technology 113(1-4): 83-96, 5 March, 2004

Effects of levels anhydrous ammonia and ammoniation periods on the degradability of the dry matter and cell wall constituents in the corn (Zea mays L.) stover. Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Zootecnia 24(5): 693-705, 1995

Putative seedling ferulate ester maize mutant morphology, biomass yield, and stover cell wall composition and rumen degradability. Crop Science: 1, 403-418, 2010

The effect of the level of alfalfa haylage consolidation on the degradability of dry matter and protein in sheep rumen. Acta Agraria et Silvestria Series Zootechnia 28: 43-54, 1989

The rumen digestion of dry matter, nitrogen and cell wall constituents of the pods of Leucaena leucocephala and some Acacia species. Journal of the science of food and agriculture 82(1): 98-106, 2002

The effect of mulch from three multipurpose trees (MPTS) on weed composition and biomass in maize. 1997 Brighton crop protection conference: weeds Proceedings of an international conference, Brighton, UK, 17-20 November 1997 (Volume 2): 653-654, 1997

The degradation of oilseed cakes and their effects on the intake and rumen degradability of maize stover given to ethiopian menz sheep. Animal Production 57(3): 421-428, 1993

Effect of mulch from selected multipurpose trees (MPTs) on growth, nitrogen nutrition and yield of maize (Zea mays L.). Journal of Agronomy and Crop Science 184(2): 73-80, 2000

Effect of incorporating multipurpose trees (MPTs) foliage in a basal ration of poor-quality Pennisetum purpureum hay fed to Pelibuey sheep. Journal of Applied Animal Research 17(2): 239-251, 2000

Degradability in sacco of DM and cell wall constituents in the rumen. Effect of fat contents of the diet for dairy cows. Reproduction, Nutrition, Developpement 28(1): 157-158, 1988

Effect of feeding legume pods or alfalfa in combination with poor quality grass straw on microbial enzyme activity and production of VFA in the rumen of South African Merino sheep. Small Ruminant Research 48(2): 83-94, 2003

Effect of different supplements on the degradability of organic matter, cell wall constituents, in vitro gas production and organic matter digestibility of wheat straw. Animal Feed Science & Technology. 38(2-3): 187-198, 1992