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Cognitive dysfunction in dogs


Cognitive dysfunction in dogs



Der Praktische Tierarzt 84(3): 184-190



ISSN/ISBN: 0032-681x

Cognitive function means perception, awareness, learning, memorizing, and decision making in both dogs and humans. Cognitive function enables the animal to absorb, process, and remember information from its environment. Cognitive dysfunction nowadays is defined as age-related behavioural changes which are not solely due to organ failure. The present paper describes the clinical signs of canine cognitive dysfunction as well as the responsible neuropathological changes.

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Accession: 003682638

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