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Compatibility of calcium and phosphate in four parenteral nutrition solutions for preterm neonates



Compatibility of calcium and phosphate in four parenteral nutrition solutions for preterm neonates



American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy 60(10): 1041-1044



Four parenteral nutrition (PN) solutions (mixtures A, B, C and D) designed for preterm neonates were prepared. Mixtures A and B contained 40 mg/dl of calcium and 23.5 mg/dl of phosphorus, while mixtures C and D contained 60 mg/dl of calcium and 35 mg/dl of phosphorus. An inorganic source of phosphorus (monobasic sodium phosphate) was used in mixtures A and C, while an organic source (sodium glycerophosphate) was used in mixtures B and D.

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Accession: 003689130

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 12789878

DOI: 10.1093/ajhp/60.10.1041


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