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Experimental infection of piglets with transmissible gastroenteritis virus: a comparison of three strains (Korean, Purdue and Miller)



Experimental infection of piglets with transmissible gastroenteritis virus: a comparison of three strains (Korean, Purdue and Miller)



Journal of Comparative Pathology 126(1): 30-37



Eighty-four colostrum-deprived piglets aged 1 day were inoculated with either a Korean strain of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) or one of two American strains (Purdue and Miller). The purpose was to compare, by morphometric analysis and in-situ hybridization, the Korean strain with the two American strains in respect of pathogenicity and viral distribution over a period of 72 h. The progression of infection in pigs infected with the Korean strain was much slower than that in pigs infected with either of the two American strains. At 6 h post-inoculation (hpi), the mean score of the villous height/crypt depth (VH/CD) ratio of pigs inoculated with the Purdue or Miller strain was significantly less than that of pigs inoculated with the Korean strain or uninfected control pigs. At 12-72 hpi, however, the VH/CD ratio of all infected pigs was significantly less than that of control pigs. In-situ hybridization showed significant differences between the Korean and American strains in terms of the amount of TGEV nucleic acid at 6, 12 and 60 hpi. TGEV nucleic acid was detected in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum of pigs inoculated with the Purdue or Miller strain but only in the jejunum and ileum of those inoculated with the Korean strain. The results suggested that the Korean strain was less virulent than the two American strains.

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Accession: 003764135

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 11814319

DOI: 10.1053/jcpa.2001.0517


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