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Neurosteroid-induced hyperalgesia through a histamine release is inhibited by progesterone and p,p'-DDE, an endocrine disrupting chemical


, : Neurosteroid-induced hyperalgesia through a histamine release is inhibited by progesterone and p,p'-DDE, an endocrine disrupting chemical. Neurochemistry International 42(5): 401-407

The intraplantar injection of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), a representative neurosteroid, showed hyperalgesia in the Hargreaves' thermal or automatic paw-pressure mechanical nociception test. The DHEAS-induced hyperalgesia was abolished by diphenhydramine (DPH), a H(1) histamine (His) receptor antagonist, as well as the hyperalgesia induced by His or compound 48/80, a mast cell degranulating agent. The DHEAS-induced hyperalgesia was also blocked by progesterone (PROG), another type of neurosteroid and a putative neurosteroid receptor antagonist. Neither DPH nor PROG showed any changes in the thermal threshold. On the other hand, endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are known to disrupt reproductive system in wild-lives and humans through the disturbance of the endocrine homeostasis. In this study, the flexor responses induced by intraplantar injection of DHEAS were blocked by p,p'-DDE, an EDC as well as by PROG in the algogenics-induced nociceptive flexor responses test (ANF test) in mice. Similarly, p,p'-DDE blocked the DHEAS-induced hyperalgesia in Hargreaves' thermal nociception test. Besides the hyperalgesic actions, DHEAS increased vascular permeability as measured with Evans blue plasma extravasation. Consistent with behavioral studies, it was blocked by DPH, PROG, and p,p'-DDE. These results suggest that DHEAS has significant hyperalgesic and vasodilatory actions through histamine release, and these actions were reversible by PROG and an EDC.

Accession: 003859392

PMID: 12510023

DOI: 10.1016/s0197-0186(02)00135-3

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