+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Completion of the Pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis (Temminck et Schlegel) life cycle



Completion of the Pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis (Temminck et Schlegel) life cycle



Aquaculture Research 36(5): 413-421



Tuna aquaculture is currently dependent on the wild capture of juveniles for production. The development of hatchery technology for bluefin and other tunas would be a major step forward in improving sustainability of their aquaculture. The present study overviews the technology in the life cycle completion of the Pacific bluefin tuna (PBT) Thunnus orientalis (Temminck et Schlegel) under aquaculture conditions in Kinki University, and the problems to be solved for the establishment of tuna hatchery technology. On 23 June 2002, broodstock of PBT that were artificially hatched and reared spontaneously spawned in captivity. The resulting eggs hatched and were subsequently reared to the juvenile stage. The spawning fish were the result of a research project started in 1987 to rear wild-caught juvenile PBT that were several months old. Fertilized eggs were obtained from these fish in 1995 and 1996. Resulting juveniles (the artificially hatched first generation) were reared to maturity and spawned in 2002. Over the summer of 2002, 1.63 million eggs from these fish were used for a mass rearing experiment, and 17 307 juveniles were produced and transferred to an open sea net cage. Of these artificially hatched second-generation PBT, 1100 grew to approximately 95 cm total length and 14 kg body weight in 22 months. This procedure means the completion of PBT life cycle under aquaculture conditions, which was first attained among large tuna species. The problems awaiting solution in PBT hatchery production are their unpredictable spawning in captivity, to improve survival during the first 10 days post hatch, to reduce cannibalism in larval and juvenile stages, and to solve collision problem causing high mortality during the juvenile stage.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 004084377

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2109.2005.01222.x


Related references

Allozyme and mitochondrial DNA separation of Pacific northern bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus orientalis Temminck and Schlegel, from southern bluefin tuna, Thunnus maccoyii Castelnau. Marine and Freshwater Research 46.6: 921-930, 1995

Potential growth rates in fattened/farmed pacific bluefin tuna thunnus orientalis temminck and schlegel and southern bluefin tuna thunnus maccoyii castelnau. International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas Collective Volume of Scientific Papers 66, 2011

Gustatory responses in Pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis (Temminck and Schlegel). Aquaculture Research 37(9): 847-854, 2006

Changes in myoglobin content and proximate compositions of the dorsal ordinary muscles of full-cycle cultured Pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis (Temminck et Schlegel) with body size. Aquaculture Research 38(2): 201-205, 2007

Retinal ganglion cell topography in juvenile Pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis (Temminck and Schlegel). Fish Physiology and Biochemistry 40(1): 23-32, 2014

Energy partitioning in cultured juvenile Pacific bluefin tuna, Thunnus orientalis (Temminck & Schlegel, 1844). Aquaculture Research 47(7): 2040-2049, 2016

Effect of Artemia enrichment on the growth and survival of Pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis (Temminck & Schlegel) larvae. Aquaculture Research 37(16): 1662-1670, 2006

Diel and ontogenetic body density change in Pacific bluefin tuna, Thunnus orientalis (Temminck and Schlegel), larvae. Aquaculture Research 37(12): 1172-1179, 2006

Genetic heterogeneity of betanodaviruses in juvenile production trials of Pacific bluefin tuna, Thunnus orientalis (Temminck & Schlegel). Journal of Fish Diseases 32(10): 815-823, 2009

Influence of initial swimbladder inflation failure on survival of Pacific bluefin tuna, Thunnus orientalis Temminck and Schlegel, larvae. Aquaculture Research 45(5): 882-892, 2014

Mortality processes of hatchery-reared Pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis (Temminck et Schlegel) larvae in relation to their piscivory. Aquaculture Research 49(1): 11-18, 2018

Cardicola opisthorchis n. sp. (Trematoda: Aporocotylidae) from the Pacific bluefin tuna, Thunnus orientalis (Temminck & Schlegel, 1844), cultured in Japan. Parasitology International 60(3): 307-312, 2011

Optimal periods of night-time lighting in the sea cage culture of Pacific bluefin tuna, Thunnus orientalis, juvenile Temminck and Schlegel. Aquaculture Research 45(7): 1109-1115, 2014

Kudoa prunusi n. sp. (Myxozoa: Multivalvulida) from the brain of Pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis (Temminck & Schlegel, 1844) cultured in Japan. Parasitology International 60(1): 90-96, 2011

Effects of feeding conditions and size differences on aggressive behaviour and cannibalism in the Pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis Temminck and Schlegel larvae. Aquaculture Research aop(aop), 2012