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Effects of ad libitum and restricted feeding of concentrates on body weight gain, feed intake and blood metabolites of Hanwoo steers at various growth stages



Effects of ad libitum and restricted feeding of concentrates on body weight gain, feed intake and blood metabolites of Hanwoo steers at various growth stages



Journal of Animal Science and Technology 47(5): 745-758



258 Hanwoo steers were used in a completely randomized design experiment to determine the effects of ad libitum or restricted feeding of concentrates on body weight (BW) gain, feed intake, blood metabolites and haematological parameters. Steers, 6 months of age, were assigned to feeding groups: ad libitum (T1) or restricted (T2) feeding at 18 months of age. Steers in both groups were fed ad libitum from 19 months of age.

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Accession: 004131172

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