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Interaction of dietary calcium and non-phytin phosphorus on pathology of tibial development in broiler chicken



Interaction of dietary calcium and non-phytin phosphorus on pathology of tibial development in broiler chicken



Indian Journal of Veterinary Pathology 27(1): 36-38



A pathological study of tibial bone characteristics in broiler chickens was undertaken by feeding different levels of calcium (Ca 6, 7, 8, and 9 g/kg diet) and non-phytin phosphorus (NPP 3, 3.5, 4 and 4.5 g/kg diet) from day 1 to 21 days of age. The leg abnormality score increased with increased dietary Ca levels at 3 g NPP/kg and the score decreased with increased NPP levels in the diet. Gross pathological changes included thickened and hypertrophied cartilage with non-calcified areas.

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Accession: 004209823

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