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Lack of association between dyslipidemia and insulin resistance in HIV-infected persons treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy



Lack of association between dyslipidemia and insulin resistance in HIV-infected persons treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy



Nutrition 20(11-12): 1022-1025



Highly active antiretroviral therapy has been implicated in the development of metabolic toxicities, including insulin resistance. Because it is "clinically silent," insulin resistance is often undetected, thus precluding the initiation of treatments that may prevent progression to frank diabetes. Previous studies have documented associations between dyslipidemic profiles and insulin resistance in patients who do not have the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Therefore, we explored whether serum lipids, parameters that are routinely measured in patients who have HIV or the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, could be used to facilitate the identification of insulin resistance in patients infected with HIV. Thirty-three adult patients who had clinically stable HIV infection and treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy fasted overnight and underwent phlebotomy to measure the following parameters: insulin levels, blood glucose, triacylglycerols, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and total cholesterol. Of the 33 participants, 15 had dyslipidemia, defined according to Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III criteria, and 18 did not have dyslipidemia. The two groups did not differ significantly with respect to mean fasting insulin levels (P = 0.68). Only two participants had insulin levels that were higher than the laboratory reference range. No significant correlations were found between fasting insulin levels and any lipid parameters. Serum lipids are not predictive of fasting insulin levels in adult patients who are treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy. The findings are limited by the low prevalence of insulin resistance in the study sample and the small sample size.

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Accession: 004218477

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 15561494

DOI: 10.1016/j.nut.2004.08.013


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