Relationships of serum leptin levels with biochemical markers of bone turnover and with growth factors in normal weight and overweight children

Bini, V.; Igli Baroncelli, G.; Papi, F.; Celi, F.; Saggese, G.; Falorni, A.

Hormone Research 61(4): 170-175

2004


ISSN/ISBN: 0301-0163
PMID: 14726619
DOI: 10.1159/000076134
Accession: 004298818

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Abstract
To examine the hypothesis of an influence of leptin on growth factors and on biochemical markers of bone turnover of prepubertal overweight children. 395 prepubertal children, 6-13 years of age, were selected and the relationships between circulating serum levels of leptin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), insulin growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and some biochemical markers of bone turnover (osteocalcin, OC; carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen, PICP, and carboxyterminal propeptide of type I collagen, ICTP) were analyzed. The subjects were subdivided into normal weight (NW, n = 163) and weight excess (WE, n = 232) subjects. Significant differences between the two groups were found for leptin (p < 0.01), IGF-I (p < 0.01) and IGFBP-3 (p < 0.01), with higher values in WEs, and for OC (p < 0.01) with higher values in NWs. A significant reduction of leptin (p < 0.01) and IGFBP-3 (p < 0.01) serum values and an increase of those of OC (p < 0.01) and PICP (p < 0.05), but not of ICTP, were registered in 103 WEs who showed a drop in weight excess during a weight-excess reduction program. No variations were observed in 26 non-responsive subjects. In a multivariate analysis in which leptin, corrected by BMI and sex, was the independent variable, a significant negative correlation was found with PICP (beta = -0.235, p < 0.01), IGF-I (beta = -0.180, p < 0.01) and height velocity (beta = -0.155, p < 0.01). There was no correlation with OC, ICTP and IGFBP-3. The results demonstrate that nutritional status and leptin levels are involved in the regulation of growth factors and biochemical markers of bone formation.