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Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in the feces of Alberta feedlot cattle



Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in the feces of Alberta feedlot cattle



Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research 68(2): 150-153



Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a public health concern. Bacterial culture techniques commonly used to detect E. coli O157:H7 will not detect other STEC serotypes. Feces from cattle and other animals are a source of O157:H7 and other pathogenic serotypes of STEC. The objective of this study was to estimate the pen-level prevalence of Shiga toxins and selected STEC serotypes in pre-slaughter feedlot cattle.

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Accession: 004317280

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PMID: 15188961


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