Improving productivity and profitability of rice (Oryza sativa) -wheat (Triticum aestivum) cropping system through tillage and planting management

Singh, K.K.; Jat, A.S.; Sharma, S.K.

Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences 75(7): 396-399

2005


ISSN/ISBN: 0019-5022
Accession: 004440707

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Abstract
A field experiment was conducted at Modipuram, Meerut, Uttar Pradesh, India from the rainy season of 2000 to the winter season of 2003, to evaluate the effects of different wheat sowing methods (zero till drilling, strip till drilling, bed planting and conventional sowing) and rice planting methods (direct dry sowing, direct sprouted seed sowing, manual transplanting and mechanical transplanting by self-propelled rice transplanter). Mechanical transplanting of rice yielded 6.25 tonnes grain and 6.94 tonnes straw/ha, which were at par with manual transplanting but significantly higher than both direct sowing methods. The mechanical transplanting was most cost-effective and energy-efficient, requiring lowest specific energy (408 kcal/kg) and specific cost (Rs 2.27/kg), and providing maximum benefit:cost ratio (2.34) and energy output:input ratio (7.36). In wheat, strip till drilling resulted in higher growth and grain (5.67 tonnes/ha) and straw (7.82 tonnes/ha) yields, followed by zero till drilling, conventional sowing and bed planting. The strip till drilling was most cost-effective and energy-efficient method, requiring lowest specific energy (430 kcal/kg) and specific cost (Rs 1.91/kg), and providing maximum benefit:cost ratio (3.67) and energy output:input ratio (6.98). However, conventional sowing was least cost-effective and energy-efficient, requiring maximum specific energy (543 kcal/kg) and specific cost (Rs 2.52/kg), and providing minimum benefit:cost ratio (2.81) and energy output:input ratio (5.52).