+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Modelling the impact of opportunistic screening on the sequelae and public healthcare costs of infection with Chlamydia trachomatis in Australian women



Modelling the impact of opportunistic screening on the sequelae and public healthcare costs of infection with Chlamydia trachomatis in Australian women



Public Health 120(1): 42-49



Objectives: To describe the health outcomes and public healthcare costs of a single screening for Chlamydia trachomatis in Australian women aged 15-34 years. Methods: A decision analytic model was used to determine the epidemiological estimates of prevalence and costs of C. trachomatis infection and its diagnosis, treatment and sequelae.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 004451737

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 16271271

DOI: 10.1016/j.puhe.2005.03.002


Related references

Modelling the healthcare costs of an opportunistic chlamydia screening programme. Sexually Transmitted Infections 80(5): 363-370, 2004

Screening and treatment to prevent sequelae in women with Chlamydia trachomatis genital infection: how much do we know?. Journal of Infectious Diseases 201 Suppl 2: S156-S167, 2010

Opportunistic screening for Chlamydia trachomatis in men attending three different secondary healthcare settings. Sexually Transmitted Infections 83(4): 282-285, 2007

Opportunistic screening for genital infections with Chlamydia trachomatis in sexually active population of Amsterdam. II. Cost-effectiveness analysis of screening women. Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Geneeskunde 143(13): 677-681, 1999

Opportunistic screening of young men for urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis infection in general practice. Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases 37(1): 35-39, 2005

Comparing cost effectiveness of screening women for Chlamydia trachomatis in systematic and opportunistic approaches. Sexually Transmitted Infections 78(1): 73-74, 2002

Should a low prevalence of asymptomatic Chlamydia trachomatis infection in gay men attending HIV clinics discourage from opportunistic screening?. International Journal of Std & Aids 16(9): 622-624, 2005

Risk of sequelae after Chlamydia trachomatis genital infection in women. Journal of Infectious Diseases 201 Suppl 2: S134-S155, 2010

Opportunistic screening for genital infections with Chlamydia trachomatis among the sexually active population in Amsterdam. III. Cost-effectiveness analysis of screening women and the role of reinfection and partner treatment. Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Geneeskunde 143(47): 2383-2385, 1999

Managing genital chlamydia trachomatis infection in Scotland: targeted opportunistic testing or a screening programme?. Health Bulletin 59(6): 396-404, 2003

Association between enhanced screening for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae and reductions in sequelae among women. Journal of Adolescent Health 51(1): 80-85, 2012

Relation between Chlamydia trachomatis infection and pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy and tubal factor infertility in a Dutch cohort of women previously tested for chlamydia in a chlamydia screening trial. Sexually Transmitted Infections 2019, 2019

Risk factors and reproductive sequelae associated with Chlamydia trachomatis infection in infertile women. Salud Publica de Mexico 45 Supp 5: S672-S680, 2004

Opportunistic screening for genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection and partner follow-up in family planning clinics in three Scottish cities. Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care 30(2): 84-85, 2004

Further details on sequelae at the cervical and tubal level of Chlamydia trachomatis infection in infertile women. Fertility and Sterility 56(1): 20-26, 1991