EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,869,633
Abstracts:
29,686,251
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Effect of mycorrhizal inoculation and compost supply on growth and nutrient uptake of young leek plants grown on peat-based substrates



Effect of mycorrhizal inoculation and compost supply on growth and nutrient uptake of young leek plants grown on peat-based substrates



HortScience: a ication of the American Society for Horticultural Science 41(3): 628-632



Organic horticultural production systems often are characterized by the use of beneficial soil microorganisms because the application of soluble inorganic P or N fertilizers is not endorsed. Due to the limited supply of soluble nutrients in organic production systems, nutrient deficiency may limit plant growth and yield. The sole use of peat for pot-based cultures is also discouraged in organic production systems. Therefore, we have studied viable alternatives for highly soluble fertilizers and pure peat substrates using leek [Allium ampeloprasum L. var. Porrum] as a test plant. Plants were grown on peat-based substrates with different rates of compost additions, and with and without inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Inoculation with a commercial AM fungus inoculum resulted in colonization rates of up to 70% of total root length, whereas not inoculated plants remained free of root colonization. Mycorrhizal fungus colonization increased shoot Zn and K concentrations, but did not significantly affect shoot dry matter or shoot N and P concentrations. In contrast, compost addition increased plant growth, and also increased P and K concentrations in plants. We conclude that plants with high rates of mycorrhizal colonization can be obtained on peat-based substrates, but that under these conditions plants may not consistently benefit in growth from the mycorrhizal symbiosis. In contrast, additions of compost are a possible means to improve the substrate quality in organic horticultural production.

(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 004512720

Download citation: RISBibTeXText



Related references

Growth and nutrient uptake by highbush blueberry plants in a peat medium as influenced by pH, applied micronutrients and mycorrhizal inoculation. Scientia horticulturae 27(3-4): 285-294, 1985

Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization and two levels of compost supply on nutrient uptake and flowering of pelargonium plants. Mycorrhiza 17(5): 469-474, 2007

Growth and nutrient uptake by highbush blueberry vaccinium corymbosum cultivar blueray plants in a peat medium as influenced by ph applied micronutrients and mycorrhizal inoculation. Scientia Horticulturae (Amsterdam) 27(3-4): 285-294, 1985

Effect of varied soil nitrogen supply on growth and nutrient uptake of young Norway spruce plants grown in a shaded environment. Zeitschrift fur Pflanzenernahrung und Bodenkunde 162(3): 301-307, 1999

Mycorrhizal inoculation enhances growth and nutrient uptake of micropropagated apple rootstocks during weaning in commercial substrates of high nutrient availability. Applied Soil Ecology 15(2): 113-118, 2000

Effect of vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation on growth and nutrient uptake of leguminous plants under stress conditions. Journal of Mycology and Plant Pathology 33(1): 33-36, 2003

Effect of composition of nutrient solution on nutrient and water uptake, growth and yield of 'Nyoho' strawberry grown with peat based substrate. Horticultural Research Japan 1(3): 199-204, 2002

Can mycorrhizal inoculation stimulate the growth and flowering of peat-grown ornamental plants under standard or reduced watering?. Applied Soil Ecology 80: 93-99, 2014

Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation on growth, yield, nutrient uptake and irrigation water productivity of sunflowers grown under drought stress. Agricultural Water Management 117(none), 2013

Growth and mineral nutrition of non-mycorrhizal and mycorrhizal Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings grown in semi-hydroponic sand culture. I. Growth and mineral nutrient uptake in plants supplied with different forms of nitrogen. New Phytologist 133(3): 469-478, 1996

Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation and phosphorus supply on the growth and nutrient uptake of Kandelia obovata (Sheue, Liu & Yong) seedlings in autoclaved soil. Applied Soil Ecology 75: 162-171, 2014

Effect of Green Waste Compost and Mycorrhizal Fungi on Calcium, Potassium, and Sodium Uptake of Woody Plants Grown Under Salt Stress. Water, Air & Soil Pollution 223(2): 787-800, 2012

The effect of nitrogen on root growth and nutrient uptake of young tea plants camellia sinensis l. grown in sand culture. Fertilizer Research 16(1): 59-66, 1988

Effect of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation on the growth and nutrient uptake of micropropagated oil palm. Menara Perkebunan 61(3): 56-60, 1993

Effect of vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation on growth and nutrient uptake of blackgram. Journal of Mycology and Plant Pathology 29(2): 201-204, 1999