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A study of traumatic injuries to primary and young permanent anterior teeth


Kaohsiung Journal of Medical Sciences 3(3): 199-206
A study of traumatic injuries to primary and young permanent anterior teeth
The number of patients who suffered from traumatic injuries to primary and young permanent anterior teeth has increased in recent years. In this report 34 cases of traumatic injuries to primary and young permanent anterior teeth, collected from 1984 through 1986 at Pedodontic Department of Kaohsiung Medical College Hospital are reviewed; 20 were male patients, 14 were female patients. The ages of the patients ranged from 7 months to 11 years 8 months. 20 of the 34 cases (58.8%) were traumatic injuries to primary dentition. 14 of the 34 cases (41.2%) were traumatic injuries to permanent dentition. In primary and permanent dentition, the prevalence of injuries in the maxilla (79.4%) was greater than in the mandible (11.8%), and in turn the jaw greater than in the maxilla and mandible (8.8%). Maxillary central incisors were the most frequently involved in both dentitions. The largest number of injuries to primary teeth was found between 1 and 4 years of age, with a peak at 1 1/2 years. In the permanent dentition the most common age of trauma was between ages 8 and 11 1/2, with a peak at 9 years. The sex ratio of injuries to the permanent dentition was 4:3 (boys to girls), and 3:2 in the primary dentition. Two thirds of injuries were sustained outdoors and one third indoors. Some of the causes of dental injuries reported were: impact, fall, epilepsy and traffic accident. Falling down was the most common cause of injury, both outdoors and indoors.

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Accession: 004634959



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