+ Site Statistics
References:
52,654,530
Abstracts:
29,560,856
PMIDs:
28,072,755
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Breakdown and formation of high energy phosphates and octopine in the adductor muscle of the scallop chlamys opercularis during escape swimming and recovery



Breakdown and formation of high energy phosphates and octopine in the adductor muscle of the scallop chlamys opercularis during escape swimming and recovery



Journal of Comparative Physiology B Biochemical Systemic and Environmental Physiology 126(3): 269-276



Chlamys opercularis uses jet propulsion swimming to escape if attacked by the star fish Marthasterias glacialis. The energy for these rapid movements was supplied by the depletion of the phosphagen phospho-L-arginine. During escape swimming the energy charge of the adductor muscle drops from 0.93 to 0.42. Due to the decrease of phospho-L-arginine from 20.4 to 1.5 .mu.mol/g fresh wt there was a concomitant increase of L-arginine from 14.7-34.7 .mu.mol/g fresh wt. No octopine, D- or L-lactate, was accumulated in exhausted animals. During the first 30 min of recovery in aerated sea water, octopine, instead of lactate, was synthesized in adductor muscles. The energy charge rose to 0.92. Within 60 min the phospho-L-arginine pool was replenished and 1/2 of the accumulated octopine again metabolized. During anaerobic recovery, octopine synthesis was pronounced (7.5 .mu.mol/g fresh wt/h). The energy charge increased to 0.85. Under these conditions no phospho-L-arginine was formed. There was no evidence for transport of octopine from the adductor muscle to other tissues.

(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 004857934

Download citation: RISBibTeXText


Related references

Energy supply and the formation of octopine in the adductor muscle of the scallop pecten jacobaeus. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology B 58(3): 249-252, 1977

Energy supply & formation of octopine in the adductor muscle of the scallop, Pecten jacobaeus. Comparative Biochem Physiol (B): 583: 249-252, 1977

Aerobic metabolism octopine production and phospho arginine as sources of energy in the phasic and catch adductor muscles of the giant scallop placopecten magellanicus during swimming and the subsequent recovery period. Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology B 70(1): 35-44, 1981

Control of D-octopine formation in scallop adductor muscle as revealed through thermodynamic studies of octopine dehydrogenase. Journal of Experimental Biology 215(Pt 9): 1515-1522, 2012

Size- and age-dependent changes in adductor muscle swimming physiology of the scallop Aequipecten opercularis. Journal of Experimental Biology 211(Pt 15): 2492-2501, 2008

Swimming of the scallop, Chlamys opercularis (L.). J exp mar Biol Ecol, 6: 179-185, 1971

Escape responses of the queen scallop Chlamys opercularis (L.) (Mollusca: Bivalvia). Marine Behaviour and Physiology, 52: 103-113, 1978

Escape responses of the queen scallop chlamys opercularis mollusca bivalvia. Marine Behaviour and Physiology 5(2): 103-114, 1978

The swimming speed and endurance of the queen scallop Chlamys opercularis in relation to trawling. Report Underwater Association New Series. 1978 ; 4: 57-72, 1979

Octopine in postmortem adductor muscle of the sea scallop (Placopecten magellanicus). Journal Fish Res Bd Canada, 28: 869-874, 1971

Energy metabolism and octopine formation of the common whelk buccinum undatum during escape and recovery. Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology B 65(3): 543-548, 1980

Previously unknown apicomplexan species infecting Iceland scallop, Chlamys islandica (Müller, 1776), queen scallop, Aequipecten opercularis L., and king scallop, Pecten maximus L. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology 108(3): 147-155, 2012