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Cadmium chloride susceptibility, a characteristic of Campylobacter spp



Cadmium chloride susceptibility, a characteristic of Campylobacter spp



Journal of Clinical Microbiology 21(5): 708-710



We report a simple diagnostic characteristic useful in the presumptive identification of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. Filter paper disks impregnated with cadmium chloride were placed on streaked agar medium. Zones of growth inhibition for Campylobacter spp. occurred at 1.25 micrograms per disk. Other enteropathogens (Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Escherichia coli, and Yersinia enterocolitica) were resistant to at least 40 micrograms per disk, with the exception of a strain of Shigella flexneri, which showed first susceptibility at 10 micrograms per disk. Most of the 52 Campylobacter strains, which were isolated from human clinical and animal sources, showed zones of inhibition greater than 10 mm with 2.5 micrograms of cadmium chloride per disk. At 20 micrograms per disk, Campylobacter isolates from clinical sources were significantly (P less than 0.01) more susceptible to cadmium chloride inhibition than were those from meat samples.

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Accession: 004864856

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PMID: 3998099


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