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Changes of cardiac mechanics electrocardiographic and myocardial lactate in anesthetized dogs under progressive hypoxia



Changes of cardiac mechanics electrocardiographic and myocardial lactate in anesthetized dogs under progressive hypoxia



Acta Physiologica Sinica 37(5): 444-449



In 10 anesthetized adult dogs exposed to acute progressive hypoxia, changes of cardiac mechanics, as expressed by the "cardiac force loop" and cardiac conductivity and excitability revealed by ECG changes, were observed. Myocardial lactate concentrations were also determined under similar experimental conditions. In early hypoxia, an enlargement in "cardiac force loop" (FLo) and a decrease in "cardiac force efficiency" (SV/FLo) were found, ECG did not show significant changes. At the early stage of cardiac pump failure, when FLo shrinked and SV/FLo increases, some marked changes in the ventricular repolarization occurred, i.e., elevated STI segment and increased amplitude of T wave. Heart rate decreased significantly at this stage. Arrhythmia appeared during marked shrinkage in FLo. When severe hypoxia led to FLo shrinkage, the myocardial lactate concentration was much higher than that of the control (P < 0.05). The results of the present investigation indicate that the changes of cardiac mechanics occur earlier in the course of progressive hypoxia. Thus in assessing acute hypoxia tolerance of the heart, mechanical events offer much more sensitive parameters than the electrical activity does.

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Accession: 004917059

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