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Diet composition, environmental temperature, and exogenous estradiol effects on hepatic lipid deposition in growing chicks



Diet composition, environmental temperature, and exogenous estradiol effects on hepatic lipid deposition in growing chicks



Poultry Science 63(3): 524-531



The interrelationships among dietary composition, environmental temperature, and level of estradiol (E2) administration on hepatic lipid deposition in chicks were studied. Two levels of E2 were injected at 3 intervals over a 4-day period, in 3-wk-old male Leghorn chicks fed either a corn-soybean meal (CS) diet or a diet containing fish meal (FM) after 2 days fasting. The chicks were subjected to temperature ranges of 15.degree. to 24.degree. C (low) or 24.degree. to 35.degree. C (high) at 2 wk of age. The E2 (in silastic tubes) was also implanted s.c. in 3-wk-old broiler chicks fed either the CS diet or a diet containing fish meal, alfalfa meal, and Torula yeast (FAY) from day of age to 6 wk. They were subjected to the high and low temperature ranges at 3 wk. Liver lipid deposition markedly increased with E2 administration among chicks fed all diets within both temperature ranges. Liver lipid was significantly greater at 24.degree. to 35.degree. C than at 15.degree.-24.degree. C among estrogenized chicks. Feeding the FM or the FAY diet decreased hepatic lipid accumulation as compared to feeding the CS diet, but the ameliorative effect of the FM diet on hepatic lipid deposition was not observed at the low temperature or at the lower level of implantation. A range for estrogen administration evidently exists wherein dietary effects are expressed. Environmental temperature, dietary composition, estrogen level, and their interactions apparently influence hepatic lipid deposition. High temperature evidently augments liver response to estrogen. [Implication for fatty liver hemorrhagic syndrome are discussed.].

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Accession: 005147707

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 6718303

DOI: 10.3382/ps.0630524


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